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August 6, 2022

The Mark of the Beast: Will the World End Because of Technology?

The Mark of the Beast: Will the World End Because of Technology?

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BY: TARTLE

Summary

Is modern technology, especially biometrics, sending us to our doom? Alexander and Jason discuss theories relating biblical catastrophe to tech innovation, and ways we can navigate oppressive surveillance and shady data collection methods in today’s troubled times.

If you’ve ever been remotely interested in conspiracy theories, you may have heard of the one where technology will eventually innovate to a point where it becomes a vessel for the mark of the beast.

The mark of the beast is a biblical term for a symbol for the Antichrist, or opposition to God. In this episode, Alexander and Jason discuss modern theories that parallel this mark to biometric scanning, barcode, and the implantable RFID chip.

Renewed and Informed Consent in Data Collection

Companies and governments using COVID-19 to collect biometric data on us and enforcing more data collection under the guise of public safety or convenience.

This episode covers how often, companies assume that they can expand upon our initial consent for data collection. But consent needs to be renewed on a regular basis, especially as humanity explores new ways to collect and utilize data.

The oversight on our daily activities goes beyond cameras. All the apps we invest in and all the platforms we use are watching us. And once we agree to have them collect our data, where will our personal information go? 

Ensuring Public Safety in a Free Society

Do you only ever get either a free society or the assurance of public safety? Humanity has managed to progress, building safe and healthy societies for hundreds of years without the heavy surveillance that we experience today. 

Today, the right to control our digital information is an extension of our civil liberties. Sharing your data is not inherently bad and it doesn’t mean that only malicious actors will want your information. 

When you invest in platforms that recognize the hard work you put into generating all this data, you can get paid for it. You can choose who to sell your data to. And you can make sure that your hard work directly benefits institutions, actors, and entities that align with your personal values.

What’s your data worth?

Sign up for TARTLE through this link here.
Follow Alexander McCaig on Twitter and Linkedin.

Feature Image Credit: Envato Image
FOLLOW @TARTLE_OFFICIAL

For those who are hard of hearing – the episode transcript can be read below:

TRANSCRIPT

Alexander McCaig (00:10):

Okay, we are going to talk about the mark of the beast. So there was an article here that spewed us off into this side tangent, but I didn't want to learn all about it off air. I want to learn about it on air. So what's the title of this article?

Jason Rigby (00:25):

The title of this article is, The road to disastrous biometric data collection is paved with good intentions by techcrunch.com.

Alexander McCaig (00:31):

Okay. So I'm going to sum this up. Biometric data increases, big events, concert, stuff like that, palm printing, what have you. They're just warning that when that gets collected, how's it going to be used? Even if it's a startup, don't be fooled. They may get bought up by Google or Amazon, sounds like propaganda. Here's the cool part though. This transitioned over into something I heard from you that I have never heard before. Can we get into this mark of the beast thing here?

Jason Rigby (01:04):

Yeah. This is funny. So everybody has interpretations of this because we know in the Bible, the mark of the beast, Revelations 13, let me get to the verse here.

Alexander McCaig (01:16):

13, 16 through 18.

Jason Rigby (01:17):

Yeah. "It also forced all people, great and small, rich and poor free and slave, to receive a mark on their right hands or on their foreheads."

Alexander McCaig (01:25):

Okay. This mark of the beast?

Jason Rigby (01:27):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (01:28):

Regardless of who you are, where you're from, doesn't matter how wealthy, there's a time where you will be identified by this mark.

Jason Rigby (01:37):

The verse goes on that, "You can't sell, trade, buy without this."

Alexander McCaig (01:40):

You cannot essentially be a part of society without this mark. Now, I didn't know this. This is great though. Every barcode that we currently use for our products, I don't know, is this legit? Hold on, let me just look up a random barcode.

Jason Rigby (02:06):

Yeah. It's the number of the beast, is what they call it. In the Greek, it's Koine Greek.

Alexander McCaig (02:10):

Yeah.

Jason Rigby (02:13):

It's basically when we look, because this is the English translation of the Bible, but it originally goes to the Greek, is six represents the X with the space, represents 600, represents 60, and represents 6. So you go 666.

Alexander McCaig (02:26):

Got it. Now they said that we're going to have this transition. The article talked about biometric scanning, all that other stuff, and like the worry and fear of it.

Jason Rigby (02:37):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (02:39):

Apparently this area in the Bible, this guy's given this prophecy, this apostle, John, on this apocalyptic island of an apocalyptic society where the future is not going to be good, and no one can buy or sell without the mark. Here's what's really interesting. I don't know. They said here are the phases to get to the chip, like wherever these Bible studying people are.

Phase one, price stickers on products instead sticking prices on stuff.

Phase two, the barcode. Now we're tracking products.

Phase three, replace cash with cards. Well, we've done that.

Jason Rigby (03:25):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (03:26):

Wait a minute. Phase four, RFID, we do that. Now it's tap to pay.

Now the final phase, the implantable RFID chip, which is the thing that Elon Musk is talking about. And there was that lady if you've seen her on social media, she'll open up the door. Her husband invented the transdermal or subdermal RFID chip to open up doors and essentially control the whole house. She has it in her hand and I'm sure you could get it implanted in your head like Elon's talking about.

Jason Rigby (03:57):

Well, in the Bible, it goes extreme. Revelations 24 says that, "Those that refuse the mark, will be executed."

Alexander McCaig (04:05):

I'm going to refuse it.

Jason Rigby (04:06):

Yeah, that's where it goes down the scary road.

Alexander McCaig (04:10):

Who does the execution, do we know?

Jason Rigby (04:14):

How he says it is, there's a false prophet that comes on the scene. And then through that false prophet, there's these false governments and they're deceiving greats amounts of people. He said, "They look like a lamb, but then they have the mouth of a dragon." A mouth like a dragon back in those days, you got to think, what was this? 95A.D. So stories of dragons. Fire comes out, causes mass destruction on a city. And we watch Game of Thrones, so we know what dragons do.

Alexander McCaig (04:42):

Yeah. We know what the dragons do.

Jason Rigby (04:44):

In those timeframes they can devastate. Whenever you look at mass amounts of devastation, and we don't want to get in this. It's too heavy, but it gets into the food supply, and then not having enough food. He talks about what begins to happen in the food supply, how there are shortages and water issues, contamination of water. This creates all these catalysts for this to happen.

Alexander McCaig (05:11):

Right, there are all these negative events that are occurring where someone said, "We need to put control mechanisms in place," so that mark of the beast. Just to go back to the article here, it's just funny the...

Jason Rigby (05:23):

We just thought we'd throw something in there for fun for you guys.

Alexander McCaig (05:25):

Yeah. It's just an interesting [inaudible 00:05:26].

Jason Rigby (05:26):

Some people that are listening, all over the world are Christians. And so they would believe in this. That's awesome. If you don't, that's awesome. Like I said, we're not what, what do you call that at TARTLE? I feel like we're all about biometric data. In collecting your data, we want as much from you as possible. We're nefarious.

Alexander McCaig (05:46):

Yeah, exactly. I can't wait till someone takes a sound bite. Listen to what that asshole said.

Jason Rigby (05:54):

Here we go. The UK recently implemented facial scanning for lunch payment in schools.

Alexander McCaig (06:00):

Okay, kids stand here.

Jason Rigby (06:04):

Let's get you used to this.

Alexander McCaig (06:05):

Well, look at little Jimmy's face. It just melted it off.

Jason Rigby (06:08):

Yeah. Just warped.

Alexander McCaig (06:08):

Sorry. It's the prototype scanner.

Jason Rigby (06:11):

Yeah. Several schools ended up suspending the program after data privacy experts and parents pushed back.

Alexander McCaig (06:15):

Obviously, who even allowed that thing to get instituted?

Jason Rigby (06:18):

Well, it's fine if it was a closed database, but where's that data going?

Alexander McCaig (06:22):

Yeah, no one knows.

Jason Rigby (06:22):

And then are we tracking, "Okay, we know Johnny was here today for sure in attendance because we got his face. He was standing here at lunch, getting a face. Yeah, it's convenient for him to go." Just walk there, grab the little tray and leave.

Alexander McCaig (06:36):

Yeah.

Jason Rigby (06:36):

That's way convenient. You don't have to have the lunch lady.

Alexander McCaig (06:39):

No.

Jason Rigby (06:39):

Remember the lunch lady.

Alexander McCaig (06:40):

Yeah. And it's just slopping it on.

Jason Rigby (06:42):

You don't have to have her. You can just have it there, but where's the data going? It's going somewhere. It's hooked to the internet. It's going to the cloud.

Alexander McCaig (06:51):

The whole point in here is that you don't know where it goes after the fact. And this TechCrunch article writer, propaganda spewer, is just trying to say, "You can't trust anybody. They're all nefarious. They're all horrible."

Jason Rigby (07:05):

If you did facial recognition and a palm, and they were talking about that, like Live Nation and Coachella and all that, that identifies you, specifically you. So there is a security measure with that. Like, "Hey, this person's the legit person that has the ticket." They scan. "We're only going to let these people in." And you could do it really quickly. Iris of the eye, the facial recognition, the hand palm, you could get high security really fast.

Alexander McCaig (07:30):

So Kirtland Air Force Base over here in New Mexico, in the late '80s, early '90s, maybe. I think early '90s, very early, to get into certain parts of the base for the Department of Energy and stuff like that, they had palm scanners. It's really rudimentary looking at everything, but they had legitimate like this thing.

Jason Rigby (07:55):

That's cool.

Alexander McCaig (07:56):

Dude, early '90s, there are biometrical scanners. The Department of Energy is... We know that's a closed system. No one knows what the hell is going on in there. But the interesting part is that it's become a commercial item. And so with that, when things become commercialized, does it still have the same safety and security that otherwise someone who's guarding national secrets, or secret technology, whatever the hell it might be?

Jason Rigby (08:24):

I would like in this article, it mentions Shaun Moore. He's the CEO of facial recognition supplier, Trueface. I'd love to have him on the podcast. It'd be interesting.

Alexander McCaig (08:32):

I've actually used Trueface.

Jason Rigby (08:36):

With COVID, and everything that's going on with the pandemic, he said he had an overwhelming conversations with sports executives, because you got to think about this too. Any type of these live events, if you could walk into a stadium, so the facial recognition would replace the ticket, is what they're saying.

Alexander McCaig (08:55):

Yeah. That's correct.

Jason Rigby (08:56):

Like the people said in Revelation.

Alexander McCaig (08:58):

Yes, oh my God. It's happening.

Jason Rigby (09:01):

Oh, that's funny.

Alexander McCaig (09:03):

No, the interesting part though is, where's the line get drawn? The machine doesn't just say, "Oh, I'm going to scan this, this is person's face," and forget about it. It scans everybody's face, regardless if you accepted to it or not. So when you walk around all day long, how do you consent to the fact of getting your face scanned?

Jason Rigby (09:24):

We talk philosophy a lot. This is a very important paragraph that gets skipped over I think in this article. He says, "Yes, the coronavirus is a real threat," because he is talking about more companies and governments wanting to use biometric data on us and data collection under the guise of public safety or convenience. But listen to this, this is great. "Yes, the coronavirus is a real threat, but it's not an enemy. It's not embodied, nor does it have a motive. It's a virus. It's outside human control and you cannot justify human control with something that's outside of human control." He's saying, and this is where I wanted to finish off the episodes.

Alexander McCaig (10:00):

Oh, that's a really interesting thought. Can you extrapolate that?

Jason Rigby (10:04):

This is what he says. "There's this dichotomy between public safety and free societies." And we talked about this before," Is passive tech from, whether you look at eye scanning devices, breathalyzers," that's a big one.

Alexander McCaig (10:21):

They're going to put in cars.

Jason Rigby (10:22):

Yeah. BAC levels through the skin, infrared sensors, these all seem like... you look at the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, they said that drunken driver kills nearly 10,000 people per year and similar numbers in the EU. But the question is, and this is what he said. He goes, "Yeah, that's all well and good." And these are the questions he has in the article, which is a great article. He says, "But where is all the data going? Where is it being stored? Who is it being sold to?"

Alexander McCaig (10:48):

Correct.

Jason Rigby (10:49):

"And what do they plan to do with it?"

Alexander McCaig (10:50):

That's the difference with TARTLE. You know where it's stored, you know who's in control, you know when it's sold and you know what it's being used for. Oh, that's really cool. Solved. And honestly I get it, with the breathalyzer thing in the car. Malnutrition kills more people every single year, regular accidents, car accidents, are killing more people. Not just drunk driving.

Jason Rigby (11:15):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (11:15):

But think about it though. You can use these little side steps to get in and then find ways, it's just other control mechanisms. Has everybody agreed? Was there a mass vote that the National Highway put on the... that you ask the dealerships? But the thing is dealerships don't exist unless people buy the cars. You should be asking the people, "Hey, does everyone want to agree, or the majority of us to putting breathalyzers in the car? Yes or no?" "Okay, great. Glad you did. Oh, by the way, your insurance will give you a better rate if you agree to have it in the car. Let people decide from themselves.

Jason Rigby (11:49):

Themselves, yeah.

Alexander McCaig (11:50):

Yeah. That's just what it boils down to.

Jason Rigby (11:53):

This is exactly what he says. "A safe society need not be a heavily surveilled society."

Alexander McCaig (11:59):

That's correct.

Jason Rigby (11:59):

"We built increasingly safe and healthy societies for centuries without the use of a single video camera. And beyond safety, heavy surveillance, that is, this detailed and individualized is the death knell of a society that values civil liberties."

Alexander McCaig (12:13):

Yeah. At that point, it all goes out the door. The movie, V for Vendetta, just a great way to look at it. They got trucks driving around. They got cameras. They have radar dishes that are listening through, intercepting everyone's frequencies. You got this gestapos, like Fingermen they call them, everything's completely monitored. You're essentially curfewed, everything you do online, all of your television, everything. It doesn't matter what it is. There's no more civil Liberty left.

Jason Rigby (12:41):

Whenever you look at a stadium, and let's say it's, even the ticket system. So you download Ticketmaster, I'm just using them as example. You have your ticket on your phone. That Ticketmaster app to get into this live event that you had to download. What is that app collecting? What is Ticketmaster collecting?

Alexander McCaig (13:01):

What log from their phone are they taking and this-

Jason Rigby (13:03):

What data are they selling?

Alexander McCaig (13:05):

... Yeah. You have no idea. No one wants, I don't understand why these people just want to be upfront about it. They're so fearful of telling people the truth all the time, constantly.

Jason Rigby (13:18):

How do you make money? Well, tickets sales aren't that lucrative. We make very, very small percentages. How we make money is, we sell your data to other, but we are making sure that we're taking these steps when we sell it dot, dot, dot, dot. Okay. Next.

Alexander McCaig (13:31):

Tell us what you're doing?

Jason Rigby (13:32):

Or, "Hey, Ticketmaster. We do sell your data, but we sell it through a system called tartle.co. that protects your privacy."

Alexander McCaig (13:39):

Correct.

Jason Rigby (13:40):

That makes sure you have civil liberties. That's how simple it can be.

Alexander McCaig (13:45):

It's a solution for you. I feel when you eat this microphone, I don't understand why everyone just tries to dodge it for so long. Is it strictly economics? Is it fear? I don't know.

Jason Rigby (13:56):

When the government, whatever government it is, when the government's in bed with it for a profit, and so then they say, "Let's take these unnecessary security measures, and we're just using it in the guise of collecting more and more data on an individual." And then, "We're not looking at it for their safety. We're looking at it, getting more data to make more profit off the person for free."

Alexander McCaig (14:19):

And that profit is either money or control.

Jason Rigby (14:21):

That's what I think it is.

Alexander McCaig (14:21):

That's probably it.

Jason Rigby (14:23):

I don't think it's nefarious. I think they just want to make more money.

Alexander McCaig (14:25):

That's all it is. That's all it is. You just want more power.

Jason Rigby (14:30):

So Mr. John, in Revelation, on an island, this is crazy. Some people believe that he was on psychedelics when he wrote it. And if you read it, you can kind of [inaudible 00:14:43]

Alexander McCaig (14:43):

There's also a lot of stuff too. They talked about like Moses on psychedelics also. In the desert, they were talking about they eat the manna off the ground. Well, there was actually these mushroom caps that would grow in the desert. The dew was just enough at night for, I don't know how that chemistry works. But yeah, he was all like hopped up on shroomings before he was going out there. Oh, I got it.

Jason Rigby (15:05):

You got the 10 commandments.

Alexander McCaig (15:06):

You got 10 command. You got 10 shrooms.

Jason Rigby (15:08):

But for our Jewish friends that are out there, we're not saying that all Judaism was based off of mushrooms.

Alexander McCaig (15:13):

No, no.

Jason Rigby (15:14):

We're just throwing out ideas.

Alexander McCaig (15:15):

No, we're just putting out an idea out there.

Jason Rigby (15:18):

Pretty nice stuff.

Alexander McCaig (15:19):

[inaudible 00:15:19] Life is based off of a fire.

Jason Rigby (15:21):

Oh yeah, or if you had the Lord of Light or whatever that was in Game of Thrones or the lady has to sacrifice. How many unnecessary human sacrifices have we had due to gods, in the world in total I wonder? The Mayans did it all the time. It was like a huge thing.

Alexander McCaig (15:39):

Probably not as much as the-

Jason Rigby (15:41):

Throwing people in volcanoes.

Alexander McCaig (15:42):

Probably not as much as the Catholic Church. I'm serious. Think about their Crusades.

Jason Rigby (15:48):

Oh yeah.

Alexander McCaig (15:49):

You're sacrificing yourself to go fight for the church.

Jason Rigby (15:51):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (15:52):

Children's Crusades.

Jason Rigby (15:53):

Yeah. Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (15:53):

What?

Jason Rigby (15:56):

Yeah. That's pretty ruthless.

Alexander McCaig (15:58):

Think about the bloodshed. It's pretty crazy. So there's your mark on the beast. Next time we send them out on the Crusade, chip them first.

Jason Rigby (16:12):

RFID them.

Alexander McCaig (16:12):

Yeah. We got to keep our counts up.

Jason Rigby (16:14):

Well, this is a funny part too when I type in mark of the beast.

Alexander McCaig (16:14):

Here you go.

Jason Rigby (16:18):

People are saying it's the mask and the vaccine, because you could put it to anything. The technology we're going to have from 10 years from now, some of it, we won't even imagine that.

Alexander McCaig (16:28):

I can't even imagine it.

Jason Rigby (16:29):

Oh, who knows?

Alexander McCaig (16:30):

Yeah. I just hope that one day I can wear like just this full body suit. That's the only thing I have to wear.

Jason Rigby (16:36):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (16:36):

It doesn't get dirty. It's constantly cleaning my body. It recirculates all my sweat. That'd be nice.

Jason Rigby (16:42):

Yeah. I think when we look at all of this, it's a really quick solve. It's very, very easy.

Alexander McCaig (16:50):

It's simple.

Jason Rigby (16:51):

It's just adopt tartle.co.

Alexander McCaig (16:53):

It's so easy.

Jason Rigby (16:54):

It solves your data problems.

Alexander McCaig (16:55):

Yeah. For the government, for people.

Jason Rigby (16:57):

Everyone.

Alexander McCaig (16:57):

Business. Why don't we just de-risk the world by using data?

Jason Rigby (17:01):

That simple.

Alexander McCaig (17:02):

That's it. Just de-risk it all. Well, let's de-risk our future with climate change. Let's de-risk educational access. Let's de-risk economic equalization. Let's do it.

Jason Rigby (17:14):

What is here to make the globe better again?

Alexander McCaig (17:17):

Make earth better.

Jason Rigby (17:18):

We're going to have green hats not red hats.

Alexander McCaig (17:21):

MEBA, make earth better again, MEBA. It's the, oh, MEBA.

Jason Rigby (17:26):

Hey, we're voting on decentralizing everything and we're voting on humans.

Alexander McCaig (17:31):

We're putting our bet on human beings.

Jason Rigby (17:33):

With technology, and knowledge, and education.

Alexander McCaig (17:36):

Should we close this up?

Jason Rigby (17:37):

We're out.

Alexander McCaig (17:37):

Bye-bye.

 

August 6, 2022

The Mark of the Beast: Will the World End Because of Technology?

The Mark of the Beast: Will the World End Because of Technology?

SHARE: 
BY: TARTLE

Summary

Is modern technology, especially biometrics, sending us to our doom? Alexander and Jason discuss theories relating biblical catastrophe to tech innovation, and ways we can navigate oppressive surveillance and shady data collection methods in today’s troubled times.

If you’ve ever been remotely interested in conspiracy theories, you may have heard of the one where technology will eventually innovate to a point where it becomes a vessel for the mark of the beast.

The mark of the beast is a biblical term for a symbol for the Antichrist, or opposition to God. In this episode, Alexander and Jason discuss modern theories that parallel this mark to biometric scanning, barcode, and the implantable RFID chip.

Renewed and Informed Consent in Data Collection

Companies and governments using COVID-19 to collect biometric data on us and enforcing more data collection under the guise of public safety or convenience.

This episode covers how often, companies assume that they can expand upon our initial consent for data collection. But consent needs to be renewed on a regular basis, especially as humanity explores new ways to collect and utilize data.

The oversight on our daily activities goes beyond cameras. All the apps we invest in and all the platforms we use are watching us. And once we agree to have them collect our data, where will our personal information go? 

Ensuring Public Safety in a Free Society

Do you only ever get either a free society or the assurance of public safety? Humanity has managed to progress, building safe and healthy societies for hundreds of years without the heavy surveillance that we experience today. 

Today, the right to control our digital information is an extension of our civil liberties. Sharing your data is not inherently bad and it doesn’t mean that only malicious actors will want your information. 

When you invest in platforms that recognize the hard work you put into generating all this data, you can get paid for it. You can choose who to sell your data to. And you can make sure that your hard work directly benefits institutions, actors, and entities that align with your personal values.

What’s your data worth?

Sign up for TARTLE through this link here.
Follow Alexander McCaig on Twitter and Linkedin.

Feature Image Credit: Envato Image
FOLLOW @TARTLE_OFFICIAL

For those who are hard of hearing – the episode transcript can be read below:

TRANSCRIPT

Alexander McCaig (00:10):

Okay, we are going to talk about the mark of the beast. So there was an article here that spewed us off into this side tangent, but I didn't want to learn all about it off air. I want to learn about it on air. So what's the title of this article?

Jason Rigby (00:25):

The title of this article is, The road to disastrous biometric data collection is paved with good intentions by techcrunch.com.

Alexander McCaig (00:31):

Okay. So I'm going to sum this up. Biometric data increases, big events, concert, stuff like that, palm printing, what have you. They're just warning that when that gets collected, how's it going to be used? Even if it's a startup, don't be fooled. They may get bought up by Google or Amazon, sounds like propaganda. Here's the cool part though. This transitioned over into something I heard from you that I have never heard before. Can we get into this mark of the beast thing here?

Jason Rigby (01:04):

Yeah. This is funny. So everybody has interpretations of this because we know in the Bible, the mark of the beast, Revelations 13, let me get to the verse here.

Alexander McCaig (01:16):

13, 16 through 18.

Jason Rigby (01:17):

Yeah. "It also forced all people, great and small, rich and poor free and slave, to receive a mark on their right hands or on their foreheads."

Alexander McCaig (01:25):

Okay. This mark of the beast?

Jason Rigby (01:27):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (01:28):

Regardless of who you are, where you're from, doesn't matter how wealthy, there's a time where you will be identified by this mark.

Jason Rigby (01:37):

The verse goes on that, "You can't sell, trade, buy without this."

Alexander McCaig (01:40):

You cannot essentially be a part of society without this mark. Now, I didn't know this. This is great though. Every barcode that we currently use for our products, I don't know, is this legit? Hold on, let me just look up a random barcode.

Jason Rigby (02:06):

Yeah. It's the number of the beast, is what they call it. In the Greek, it's Koine Greek.

Alexander McCaig (02:10):

Yeah.

Jason Rigby (02:13):

It's basically when we look, because this is the English translation of the Bible, but it originally goes to the Greek, is six represents the X with the space, represents 600, represents 60, and represents 6. So you go 666.

Alexander McCaig (02:26):

Got it. Now they said that we're going to have this transition. The article talked about biometric scanning, all that other stuff, and like the worry and fear of it.

Jason Rigby (02:37):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (02:39):

Apparently this area in the Bible, this guy's given this prophecy, this apostle, John, on this apocalyptic island of an apocalyptic society where the future is not going to be good, and no one can buy or sell without the mark. Here's what's really interesting. I don't know. They said here are the phases to get to the chip, like wherever these Bible studying people are.

Phase one, price stickers on products instead sticking prices on stuff.

Phase two, the barcode. Now we're tracking products.

Phase three, replace cash with cards. Well, we've done that.

Jason Rigby (03:25):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (03:26):

Wait a minute. Phase four, RFID, we do that. Now it's tap to pay.

Now the final phase, the implantable RFID chip, which is the thing that Elon Musk is talking about. And there was that lady if you've seen her on social media, she'll open up the door. Her husband invented the transdermal or subdermal RFID chip to open up doors and essentially control the whole house. She has it in her hand and I'm sure you could get it implanted in your head like Elon's talking about.

Jason Rigby (03:57):

Well, in the Bible, it goes extreme. Revelations 24 says that, "Those that refuse the mark, will be executed."

Alexander McCaig (04:05):

I'm going to refuse it.

Jason Rigby (04:06):

Yeah, that's where it goes down the scary road.

Alexander McCaig (04:10):

Who does the execution, do we know?

Jason Rigby (04:14):

How he says it is, there's a false prophet that comes on the scene. And then through that false prophet, there's these false governments and they're deceiving greats amounts of people. He said, "They look like a lamb, but then they have the mouth of a dragon." A mouth like a dragon back in those days, you got to think, what was this? 95A.D. So stories of dragons. Fire comes out, causes mass destruction on a city. And we watch Game of Thrones, so we know what dragons do.

Alexander McCaig (04:42):

Yeah. We know what the dragons do.

Jason Rigby (04:44):

In those timeframes they can devastate. Whenever you look at mass amounts of devastation, and we don't want to get in this. It's too heavy, but it gets into the food supply, and then not having enough food. He talks about what begins to happen in the food supply, how there are shortages and water issues, contamination of water. This creates all these catalysts for this to happen.

Alexander McCaig (05:11):

Right, there are all these negative events that are occurring where someone said, "We need to put control mechanisms in place," so that mark of the beast. Just to go back to the article here, it's just funny the...

Jason Rigby (05:23):

We just thought we'd throw something in there for fun for you guys.

Alexander McCaig (05:25):

Yeah. It's just an interesting [inaudible 00:05:26].

Jason Rigby (05:26):

Some people that are listening, all over the world are Christians. And so they would believe in this. That's awesome. If you don't, that's awesome. Like I said, we're not what, what do you call that at TARTLE? I feel like we're all about biometric data. In collecting your data, we want as much from you as possible. We're nefarious.

Alexander McCaig (05:46):

Yeah, exactly. I can't wait till someone takes a sound bite. Listen to what that asshole said.

Jason Rigby (05:54):

Here we go. The UK recently implemented facial scanning for lunch payment in schools.

Alexander McCaig (06:00):

Okay, kids stand here.

Jason Rigby (06:04):

Let's get you used to this.

Alexander McCaig (06:05):

Well, look at little Jimmy's face. It just melted it off.

Jason Rigby (06:08):

Yeah. Just warped.

Alexander McCaig (06:08):

Sorry. It's the prototype scanner.

Jason Rigby (06:11):

Yeah. Several schools ended up suspending the program after data privacy experts and parents pushed back.

Alexander McCaig (06:15):

Obviously, who even allowed that thing to get instituted?

Jason Rigby (06:18):

Well, it's fine if it was a closed database, but where's that data going?

Alexander McCaig (06:22):

Yeah, no one knows.

Jason Rigby (06:22):

And then are we tracking, "Okay, we know Johnny was here today for sure in attendance because we got his face. He was standing here at lunch, getting a face. Yeah, it's convenient for him to go." Just walk there, grab the little tray and leave.

Alexander McCaig (06:36):

Yeah.

Jason Rigby (06:36):

That's way convenient. You don't have to have the lunch lady.

Alexander McCaig (06:39):

No.

Jason Rigby (06:39):

Remember the lunch lady.

Alexander McCaig (06:40):

Yeah. And it's just slopping it on.

Jason Rigby (06:42):

You don't have to have her. You can just have it there, but where's the data going? It's going somewhere. It's hooked to the internet. It's going to the cloud.

Alexander McCaig (06:51):

The whole point in here is that you don't know where it goes after the fact. And this TechCrunch article writer, propaganda spewer, is just trying to say, "You can't trust anybody. They're all nefarious. They're all horrible."

Jason Rigby (07:05):

If you did facial recognition and a palm, and they were talking about that, like Live Nation and Coachella and all that, that identifies you, specifically you. So there is a security measure with that. Like, "Hey, this person's the legit person that has the ticket." They scan. "We're only going to let these people in." And you could do it really quickly. Iris of the eye, the facial recognition, the hand palm, you could get high security really fast.

Alexander McCaig (07:30):

So Kirtland Air Force Base over here in New Mexico, in the late '80s, early '90s, maybe. I think early '90s, very early, to get into certain parts of the base for the Department of Energy and stuff like that, they had palm scanners. It's really rudimentary looking at everything, but they had legitimate like this thing.

Jason Rigby (07:55):

That's cool.

Alexander McCaig (07:56):

Dude, early '90s, there are biometrical scanners. The Department of Energy is... We know that's a closed system. No one knows what the hell is going on in there. But the interesting part is that it's become a commercial item. And so with that, when things become commercialized, does it still have the same safety and security that otherwise someone who's guarding national secrets, or secret technology, whatever the hell it might be?

Jason Rigby (08:24):

I would like in this article, it mentions Shaun Moore. He's the CEO of facial recognition supplier, Trueface. I'd love to have him on the podcast. It'd be interesting.

Alexander McCaig (08:32):

I've actually used Trueface.

Jason Rigby (08:36):

With COVID, and everything that's going on with the pandemic, he said he had an overwhelming conversations with sports executives, because you got to think about this too. Any type of these live events, if you could walk into a stadium, so the facial recognition would replace the ticket, is what they're saying.

Alexander McCaig (08:55):

Yeah. That's correct.

Jason Rigby (08:56):

Like the people said in Revelation.

Alexander McCaig (08:58):

Yes, oh my God. It's happening.

Jason Rigby (09:01):

Oh, that's funny.

Alexander McCaig (09:03):

No, the interesting part though is, where's the line get drawn? The machine doesn't just say, "Oh, I'm going to scan this, this is person's face," and forget about it. It scans everybody's face, regardless if you accepted to it or not. So when you walk around all day long, how do you consent to the fact of getting your face scanned?

Jason Rigby (09:24):

We talk philosophy a lot. This is a very important paragraph that gets skipped over I think in this article. He says, "Yes, the coronavirus is a real threat," because he is talking about more companies and governments wanting to use biometric data on us and data collection under the guise of public safety or convenience. But listen to this, this is great. "Yes, the coronavirus is a real threat, but it's not an enemy. It's not embodied, nor does it have a motive. It's a virus. It's outside human control and you cannot justify human control with something that's outside of human control." He's saying, and this is where I wanted to finish off the episodes.

Alexander McCaig (10:00):

Oh, that's a really interesting thought. Can you extrapolate that?

Jason Rigby (10:04):

This is what he says. "There's this dichotomy between public safety and free societies." And we talked about this before," Is passive tech from, whether you look at eye scanning devices, breathalyzers," that's a big one.

Alexander McCaig (10:21):

They're going to put in cars.

Jason Rigby (10:22):

Yeah. BAC levels through the skin, infrared sensors, these all seem like... you look at the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, they said that drunken driver kills nearly 10,000 people per year and similar numbers in the EU. But the question is, and this is what he said. He goes, "Yeah, that's all well and good." And these are the questions he has in the article, which is a great article. He says, "But where is all the data going? Where is it being stored? Who is it being sold to?"

Alexander McCaig (10:48):

Correct.

Jason Rigby (10:49):

"And what do they plan to do with it?"

Alexander McCaig (10:50):

That's the difference with TARTLE. You know where it's stored, you know who's in control, you know when it's sold and you know what it's being used for. Oh, that's really cool. Solved. And honestly I get it, with the breathalyzer thing in the car. Malnutrition kills more people every single year, regular accidents, car accidents, are killing more people. Not just drunk driving.

Jason Rigby (11:15):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (11:15):

But think about it though. You can use these little side steps to get in and then find ways, it's just other control mechanisms. Has everybody agreed? Was there a mass vote that the National Highway put on the... that you ask the dealerships? But the thing is dealerships don't exist unless people buy the cars. You should be asking the people, "Hey, does everyone want to agree, or the majority of us to putting breathalyzers in the car? Yes or no?" "Okay, great. Glad you did. Oh, by the way, your insurance will give you a better rate if you agree to have it in the car. Let people decide from themselves.

Jason Rigby (11:49):

Themselves, yeah.

Alexander McCaig (11:50):

Yeah. That's just what it boils down to.

Jason Rigby (11:53):

This is exactly what he says. "A safe society need not be a heavily surveilled society."

Alexander McCaig (11:59):

That's correct.

Jason Rigby (11:59):

"We built increasingly safe and healthy societies for centuries without the use of a single video camera. And beyond safety, heavy surveillance, that is, this detailed and individualized is the death knell of a society that values civil liberties."

Alexander McCaig (12:13):

Yeah. At that point, it all goes out the door. The movie, V for Vendetta, just a great way to look at it. They got trucks driving around. They got cameras. They have radar dishes that are listening through, intercepting everyone's frequencies. You got this gestapos, like Fingermen they call them, everything's completely monitored. You're essentially curfewed, everything you do online, all of your television, everything. It doesn't matter what it is. There's no more civil Liberty left.

Jason Rigby (12:41):

Whenever you look at a stadium, and let's say it's, even the ticket system. So you download Ticketmaster, I'm just using them as example. You have your ticket on your phone. That Ticketmaster app to get into this live event that you had to download. What is that app collecting? What is Ticketmaster collecting?

Alexander McCaig (13:01):

What log from their phone are they taking and this-

Jason Rigby (13:03):

What data are they selling?

Alexander McCaig (13:05):

... Yeah. You have no idea. No one wants, I don't understand why these people just want to be upfront about it. They're so fearful of telling people the truth all the time, constantly.

Jason Rigby (13:18):

How do you make money? Well, tickets sales aren't that lucrative. We make very, very small percentages. How we make money is, we sell your data to other, but we are making sure that we're taking these steps when we sell it dot, dot, dot, dot. Okay. Next.

Alexander McCaig (13:31):

Tell us what you're doing?

Jason Rigby (13:32):

Or, "Hey, Ticketmaster. We do sell your data, but we sell it through a system called tartle.co. that protects your privacy."

Alexander McCaig (13:39):

Correct.

Jason Rigby (13:40):

That makes sure you have civil liberties. That's how simple it can be.

Alexander McCaig (13:45):

It's a solution for you. I feel when you eat this microphone, I don't understand why everyone just tries to dodge it for so long. Is it strictly economics? Is it fear? I don't know.

Jason Rigby (13:56):

When the government, whatever government it is, when the government's in bed with it for a profit, and so then they say, "Let's take these unnecessary security measures, and we're just using it in the guise of collecting more and more data on an individual." And then, "We're not looking at it for their safety. We're looking at it, getting more data to make more profit off the person for free."

Alexander McCaig (14:19):

And that profit is either money or control.

Jason Rigby (14:21):

That's what I think it is.

Alexander McCaig (14:21):

That's probably it.

Jason Rigby (14:23):

I don't think it's nefarious. I think they just want to make more money.

Alexander McCaig (14:25):

That's all it is. That's all it is. You just want more power.

Jason Rigby (14:30):

So Mr. John, in Revelation, on an island, this is crazy. Some people believe that he was on psychedelics when he wrote it. And if you read it, you can kind of [inaudible 00:14:43]

Alexander McCaig (14:43):

There's also a lot of stuff too. They talked about like Moses on psychedelics also. In the desert, they were talking about they eat the manna off the ground. Well, there was actually these mushroom caps that would grow in the desert. The dew was just enough at night for, I don't know how that chemistry works. But yeah, he was all like hopped up on shroomings before he was going out there. Oh, I got it.

Jason Rigby (15:05):

You got the 10 commandments.

Alexander McCaig (15:06):

You got 10 command. You got 10 shrooms.

Jason Rigby (15:08):

But for our Jewish friends that are out there, we're not saying that all Judaism was based off of mushrooms.

Alexander McCaig (15:13):

No, no.

Jason Rigby (15:14):

We're just throwing out ideas.

Alexander McCaig (15:15):

No, we're just putting out an idea out there.

Jason Rigby (15:18):

Pretty nice stuff.

Alexander McCaig (15:19):

[inaudible 00:15:19] Life is based off of a fire.

Jason Rigby (15:21):

Oh yeah, or if you had the Lord of Light or whatever that was in Game of Thrones or the lady has to sacrifice. How many unnecessary human sacrifices have we had due to gods, in the world in total I wonder? The Mayans did it all the time. It was like a huge thing.

Alexander McCaig (15:39):

Probably not as much as the-

Jason Rigby (15:41):

Throwing people in volcanoes.

Alexander McCaig (15:42):

Probably not as much as the Catholic Church. I'm serious. Think about their Crusades.

Jason Rigby (15:48):

Oh yeah.

Alexander McCaig (15:49):

You're sacrificing yourself to go fight for the church.

Jason Rigby (15:51):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (15:52):

Children's Crusades.

Jason Rigby (15:53):

Yeah. Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (15:53):

What?

Jason Rigby (15:56):

Yeah. That's pretty ruthless.

Alexander McCaig (15:58):

Think about the bloodshed. It's pretty crazy. So there's your mark on the beast. Next time we send them out on the Crusade, chip them first.

Jason Rigby (16:12):

RFID them.

Alexander McCaig (16:12):

Yeah. We got to keep our counts up.

Jason Rigby (16:14):

Well, this is a funny part too when I type in mark of the beast.

Alexander McCaig (16:14):

Here you go.

Jason Rigby (16:18):

People are saying it's the mask and the vaccine, because you could put it to anything. The technology we're going to have from 10 years from now, some of it, we won't even imagine that.

Alexander McCaig (16:28):

I can't even imagine it.

Jason Rigby (16:29):

Oh, who knows?

Alexander McCaig (16:30):

Yeah. I just hope that one day I can wear like just this full body suit. That's the only thing I have to wear.

Jason Rigby (16:36):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (16:36):

It doesn't get dirty. It's constantly cleaning my body. It recirculates all my sweat. That'd be nice.

Jason Rigby (16:42):

Yeah. I think when we look at all of this, it's a really quick solve. It's very, very easy.

Alexander McCaig (16:50):

It's simple.

Jason Rigby (16:51):

It's just adopt tartle.co.

Alexander McCaig (16:53):

It's so easy.

Jason Rigby (16:54):

It solves your data problems.

Alexander McCaig (16:55):

Yeah. For the government, for people.

Jason Rigby (16:57):

Everyone.

Alexander McCaig (16:57):

Business. Why don't we just de-risk the world by using data?

Jason Rigby (17:01):

That simple.

Alexander McCaig (17:02):

That's it. Just de-risk it all. Well, let's de-risk our future with climate change. Let's de-risk educational access. Let's de-risk economic equalization. Let's do it.

Jason Rigby (17:14):

What is here to make the globe better again?

Alexander McCaig (17:17):

Make earth better.

Jason Rigby (17:18):

We're going to have green hats not red hats.

Alexander McCaig (17:21):

MEBA, make earth better again, MEBA. It's the, oh, MEBA.

Jason Rigby (17:26):

Hey, we're voting on decentralizing everything and we're voting on humans.

Alexander McCaig (17:31):

We're putting our bet on human beings.

Jason Rigby (17:33):

With technology, and knowledge, and education.

Alexander McCaig (17:36):

Should we close this up?

Jason Rigby (17:37):

We're out.

Alexander McCaig (17:37):

Bye-bye.

 

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