Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
July 15, 2022

TARTLE's Active Role in Helping YOU Win on the Internet

TARTLE's Active Role in Helping YOU Win on the Internet

TARTLE's Active Role in Helping YOU Win on the Internet

SHARE: 
BY: TARTLE

Transitioning From Web 2.0 to Web 3.0

Previously, the internet was ruled by platform monopolies and highly regulated financial systems. Think of how society used to structure office buildings: giant, centralized areas with a centralized authority, where those in power could keep a strict eye over the rest of us. 

But now, we’ve opened our eyes to the power of working remotely. People are in the sovereignty and privacy of their own homes. That’s how the internet should be.

Protecting Your Assets Online

An asset is stored work. It’s anything that was created through a person’s energy and time. On the internet, you are constantly creating information. 

Every time you choose to scroll through your feed, react to a post, or make a status, your movements are being recorded. Believe it or not, these small things are valuable information. It all builds up to create your digital identity.

The TARTLE Toolbox

What can TARTLE offer people?

A private TARTLE wallet that only they can use and access. The capacity to initiate secure transactions on an open marketplace, where people come to buy these digital assets. The ability to sell data for a digital currency and withdraw US dollars. An internal polling system for research. Shared data with provenance, everything verifiable up to the source. Complete self-custody over your information.

Basically, you have complete control over whether you share your information–and when you do choose to share it, you get paid for your efforts.

Find out what your data is worth now. Sign up for TARTLE here.

Feature Image Credit: Envato Image
FOLLOW @TARTLE_OFFICIAL

For those who are hard of hearing – the episode transcript can be read below:

TRANSCRIPT

Alexander McCaig (00:06):

Okay, Jamie, we're back. Thanks for writing again this outlier ventures on the metaverse, version six of this paper. So can we jump to the part, Jason... We've already discussed what the metaverse is, how TARTLE does it better. But how it's poorly defined here in the paper. And I'm not blaming Jamie. It's just difficult to really distill it down to what it is in simplicity.

Jason Rigby (00:39):

Yeah, and I think he begins to break it down. We're on page eight of this 34-page PDF. So he goes pretty heavy into it. But one of the things that, and these are all buzz words, metaverse, whatever, but he talks about Web3. So that's what I wanted this podcast to be, Web3 in the metaverse. He says, "So why are we so convinced of this eventually," he's talking about the metaverse. "Well, we believe there are several technology trends that are beginning to converge." This is very important.

Alexander McCaig (01:03):

Is TARTLE a great convergence?

Jason Rigby (01:05):

The great.

Alexander McCaig (01:06):

Because if you understand TARTLE, you'll be like, "Oh shit, this is very Web3."

Jason Rigby (01:10):

Yeah. And he wrote a thing called the... Back in 2016, The Convergence Thesis, which is all... And I don't want to get into IOT VR and AR because we talked about the... And AI and all that. He said, "This trend," keep in mind it was written in the context of decades, "Has, as predicted, began to play out and form the basis of our investment thesis as a venture capital firm. And accelerate going through several iterations. The second being the convergence ecosystem in 2018 and then the convergence stack in 2019." So what this all leads to is this is developing 2016 hits. Okay, we're seeing this, what developments have we had? 2018, in two years we saw major shifts. Now at 2019, we're seeing a huge shift. Then we have the great pandemic hits. And now we have an even bigger shift. The pandemic, to me, right now, more than anything, pushed Web3.

Alexander McCaig (02:01):

Yeah. Because-

Jason Rigby (02:02):

Zoom and everything that we have going on.

Alexander McCaig (02:03):

It forced things that were stuck in the very archaic centralized worlds. Think of, what is an office building? It's a giant, phallic centralized area, centralized authority, where you can keep eyes on all your little people. That's what the whole point was in the beginning. Why do you think bankers have such massive towers? But it's remote. People are in the sovereignty and the privacy of their own homes. That's a little flavor of how the internet should be, sovereign and private.

Jason Rigby (02:36):

Sovereign and private, yes.

Alexander McCaig (02:37):

Interesting. But still being, "Wait a minute. I can still generate wealth through doing my work at home for a company, but have sovereignty and privacy. Wait a minute. Wait a minute." Of course, that's exactly what's going to happen with COVID. It's going to drive Web3 to happen because the world gets a taste of how things should be, sovereign, private, wealth generation through work. It's amazing. So they have here for Web3, Web3 is a distinct and separate web paradigm to today's Web2. Web2 is just like this basic world where I go on and I view YouTube, that's it. Or like the sites-

Jason Rigby (03:22):

And there's machine learning that'll give you Netflix, that's 2.

Alexander McCaig (03:26):

Yeah, all great.

Jason Rigby (03:26):

Or just gives you more of what you want.

Alexander McCaig (03:28):

But the thing is, it's, again, centralized authorities defining the web for the users. Now, Web3 is like, "We have to have the user define the web." So Web2, based on centralized platform monopolies and highly regulated financial systems. And now, we go to Web3. What is that? One, that is increasingly decentralized, based on user centricity, and the sovereignty of their data and wealth. Holy shit. What is TARTLE? TARTLE was Web3 before Web3 was a thing. TARTLE's Web fucking 4.0.

Jason Rigby (04:09):

Yeah, we have user centricity, and that we're concerned about the sovereignty of their data and wealth. That's what it's about.

Alexander McCaig (04:16):

Yeah, and it's increasingly decentralized. And it's used by everyone, everywhere.

Jason Rigby (04:20):

It is a paradigm, ultimately based on blockchains and their atomic units of account. He's explaining TARTLE right now. Becoming the means that value is minted, created, stored, or transferred across other technologies as a form of wealth. But digital wealth that can be programmable and represent an increasing complex range of assets.

Alexander McCaig (04:42):

Whoa, whoa.

Jason Rigby (04:43):

What is an asset? Let's describe to people what we at TARTLE view an asset.

Alexander McCaig (04:47):

You know what an asset is? It's stored work.

Jason Rigby (04:50):

Yes. It's that simple.

Alexander McCaig (04:52):

It's as simple as that. An asset like this phone, I guess you could call it an asset, it depreciates in value. But there was energy that went into the generation of this thing, the creation of this. And the person who puts that energy and time into it is the person that owns that asset. So in this digital paradigm, if you are creating information, things that are logged and stored, those would otherwise not exist, Jason, if you did not put in work. If you did not chew on calories on your food, which gave you the energy to operate something digital, to create that log, it would otherwise cease to exist.

Jason Rigby (05:35):

Well, he says it's a Web3 toolbox, but we're going to say TARTLE toolbox for the sake of this.

Alexander McCaig (05:38):

It's a TARTLE toolbox.

Jason Rigby (05:39):

So number one, in his Web3 toolbox is internet money. We have that.

Alexander McCaig (05:45):

We have that.

Jason Rigby (05:45):

Decentralized finance.

Alexander McCaig (05:47):

I have that.

Jason Rigby (05:48):

DeFi is what they call it.

Alexander McCaig (05:49):

Everybody all across the globe has a TARTLE wallet. Anybody that uses it can jump on and have a total sovereign wallet, all to them.

Jason Rigby (05:57):

Sovereign virtual goods.

Alexander McCaig (05:59):

Oh, wait your data, a virtual good. Something that has almost like a plasticity to it, right?

Jason Rigby (06:06):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (06:06):

It has flexibility to be shared. It's not siloed. It's not held up. It has the ability to move.

Jason Rigby (06:11):

And those are NFTs.

Alexander McCaig (06:14):

Oh yeah, every data packet.

Jason Rigby (06:16):

Which he says, "Which can in turn have value on the open market."

Alexander McCaig (06:19):

Oh, TARTLE, it's an open marketplace, where people come to buy these digital assets. Assets that are appropriated to the work of a human being on the other side.

Jason Rigby (06:29):

Okay, here's another Web3 toolbox tool right here, digital physical redemption.

Alexander McCaig (06:34):

Okay, so I sell my data for a digital currency. And then, from that, I can bring that into the physical. I can get real US dollars if I wanted, or whatever else [inaudible 00:06:44].

Jason Rigby (06:44):

Next one is decentralized governance.

Alexander McCaig (06:47):

Oh my God. TARTLE has an internal polling system. We can literally do TARTLE research today and say, "How do you feel about this? What would you like to do?" And every single person that fills out that data packet is essentially generating an NFT, written to the chain, to say that they own it. And it was transacted, and shared that information, at this specific time, for that value.

Jason Rigby (07:05):

Next is self-sovereign identity and verifiable claims.

Alexander McCaig (07:08):

Oh my God, self... You know why it's verifiable? Because all of the data shared on TARTLE has provenance to it. It's completely verified, right back to the source. That's why, when you're actually on the TARTLE marketplace, it's called source.tartle.co.

Jason Rigby (07:25):

And then, the second to the last, is self custody, wallets and applications.

Alexander McCaig (07:30):

Fuck, we just said this. Of course it's self-custody. You decide the control, the what, when, where, and how that information is moved. And what you want to do with the money or the value you receive for the sharing of that information.

Jason Rigby (07:44):

Yeah. And this one, maybe you can explain it to me, or maybe I need to read the definition. He says, "Agent based web. Computer programs with economic agency are autonomous agents that live and transact on blockchains to carry out increasing complex automatic programs such as AEAs, Autonomous Economic Agents, via fetch.ai."

Alexander McCaig (08:01):

Dude, they're Dows.

Jason Rigby (08:03):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (08:03):

They're just Dows with AI appropriated to it. You try to say, "These are the rules for the operation of this system. Here you go. You got to run and live by it."

Jason Rigby (08:12):

And to end this, I want to talk about... He says, "Web3 is built upon foundational elements." And there's three of them.

Alexander McCaig (08:19):

Oh, foundations, this is important.

Jason Rigby (08:20):

So let's compare this to... Because he's saying these are things that are happening in the future. And we're saying the future is here and now, it's TARTLE.

Alexander McCaig (08:26):

This is for you, Jamie. This is for all the outlier-

Jason Rigby (08:28):

And everyone out there that has questions on Web3. You can peer-to-peer networks.

Alexander McCaig (08:33):

Oh my God. Every transaction on TARTLE is from one peer to another. It's from party A to party B. And the more people that join increases the size of the block lattice structure, which means it has a massive network effect of two independent parties coming together and interacting with one another.

Jason Rigby (08:53):

Transaction layer, listen to this what he says about the transaction layer. "Blockchains and other forms of distributed ledger technology, in their simplest form, allow for transfer of units of value from one network participant to another."

Alexander McCaig (09:02):

I literally just said that. Yeah, that's correct.

Jason Rigby (09:07):

And then, finally, and we'll end in this, he says, "Programmability layer, building on the transactional capability, some blockchains offer rich generic programmability to enable a wide array of use cases beyond simple transactionality, while preserving the properties of being decentralized and highly secure. Ethereum was the first mover in establishing a programmable, decentralized ledger. And is still far ahead of its competitors, in terms of adoption by developers and users." So here's my question. So Ethereum is a centralized cryptocurrency, and he's using Ethereum as an example. And I get this, there's collaborative ecosystems, all that stuff. I get all that. But ours is not some coin that we've created out of nowhere and then the value is perceived. People decide that value.

Alexander McCaig (09:49):

Drop the hammer right now.

Jason Rigby (09:50):

Ours is solely based off of... Once again, we say this over and over again, the W word, work. Your work. That's tangible.

Alexander McCaig (09:56):

It's real.

Jason Rigby (09:57):

It's real.

Alexander McCaig (09:58):

That's the basis of human civilization is work.

Jason Rigby (10:00):

Just as much as you go to a job and trade time for money, it's the same thing you're doing with your data.

Alexander McCaig (10:07):

That's precisely correct.

Jason Rigby (10:08):

And it's that simple. There's nothing... So whenever I see a combination of DeFi, NFTs, decentralized governance, decentralized cloud service, self-sovereign identity, programmability layer, all these big words and these buzz words, peer-to-peer networks, all of this, I see one thing. I see TARTLE, and it's already here. It's already created. The future is now.

Alexander McCaig (10:30):

Do you want to come adopt? It's free to adopt. It won't cost you anything.

Jason Rigby (10:34):

So let me tell you, somebody's listening to this, and they're like, "Well, how can I be involved in this, in the sense of buying data?" Like a company's listening right now, and they're like, "I want data. How do I get data?"

Alexander McCaig (10:44):

Yeah, you want to de-risk what you're doing as a business, you want to know. You want to have real interaction with real human beings. You want to transact, have something verifiable. You go tartle.co. You go on the buyer tab. Again, we designed this very simple for anyone to join. And you're going to click on, "Get started."

Jason Rigby (11:02):

And you can go to YouTube and there's walkthroughs-

Alexander McCaig (11:04):

We got walkthrough videos. I had-

Jason Rigby (11:06):

... for buyers.

Alexander McCaig (11:07):

Everything.

Jason Rigby (11:07):

For everything, yeah.

Alexander McCaig (11:08):

Doesn't matter.

Jason Rigby (11:09):

So whatever, we've made it so simple. Everybody can access YouTube. It's a platform that's available and out there.

Alexander McCaig (11:14):

We're not trying to hook you, like, "Ah, you're in, now you got to pay for all this shit. You got to do this." It's like, "No, no, no. It's all here for you.". It's all ripe for the taking. All the education, all the material, all the learning you could ever need to make this tool as valuable as possible for yourself, and the rest of the globe, is right there.

Jason Rigby (11:29):

So let me ask you this question and we'll close on this. Why would a company want to purchase raw data from TARTLE?

Alexander McCaig (11:36):

Ah, well, do you just want me to give one reason or every reason under the sun? The first one you want to do is, you want to, de-risk your business going into the future. All these businesses are becoming data driven businesses. Every company is becoming a tech company. So if you want to de-risk your evolution, you want to make sure that you evolve appropriately, and you want to do it so that you can make effective decisions that establish real relationships with your end customer, you do it through TARTLE. Does that make sense? So if you want to sign up, you want to do something smart, it's free for you to sign up. It's not like Salesforce, "Oh yeah, come and use it. Here's a 14 day free trial. And then after that, we charge you 1,000 bucks per license."

Alexander McCaig (12:18):

No, stupid, there's way too much friction. Everything about it is wrong. You can't access the resources. You can't learn anything. None of the modules, nothing. You got to pay up front for all that stuff. We saw the value in removing all that friction. We understand the importance of it. So let's get all those barriers out of the way for you and make it so easy for you to really interact with real human beings. De-risk your business and become what you're supposed to be. Help the world evolve, help your company evolve.

Jason Rigby (12:45):

I love that. And it's tartle.co. Can sign up today. How is TARTLE... I know I said I was going to do one more question, but I love this. How can businesses help TARTLE save humanity? I think this is really important.

Alexander McCaig (12:58):

This is super cool. Businesses are resource holders, that's what they are. Large businesses, they hold resources and they need to appropriate those in the proper direction. Now, when you, as a business, come on and you say, "I want to buy data from a group of individuals on the TARTLE marketplace." Those individuals can channel the resources that you've paid them for that asset towards causes, big seven causes. Stabilizing our climate, that's a big deal. Increasing educational access, that's a big deal. Public health. The people know what needs to be solved in their local communities. So it's not for you to go in and solve it for them. Every time you're buying data from them, they can then mobilize those resources to things that are truly beneficial to them in their local areas.

Speaker 3 (13:57):

Thank you for listening to TARTLE Cast with your hosts, Alexander McCaig and Jason Rigby. Where humanity steps into the future and source data defines the path, the path. What's your data worth?

July 15, 2022

TARTLE's Active Role in Helping YOU Win on the Internet

TARTLE's Active Role in Helping YOU Win on the Internet

TARTLE's Active Role in Helping YOU Win on the Internet

SHARE: 
BY: TARTLE

Transitioning From Web 2.0 to Web 3.0

Previously, the internet was ruled by platform monopolies and highly regulated financial systems. Think of how society used to structure office buildings: giant, centralized areas with a centralized authority, where those in power could keep a strict eye over the rest of us. 

But now, we’ve opened our eyes to the power of working remotely. People are in the sovereignty and privacy of their own homes. That’s how the internet should be.

Protecting Your Assets Online

An asset is stored work. It’s anything that was created through a person’s energy and time. On the internet, you are constantly creating information. 

Every time you choose to scroll through your feed, react to a post, or make a status, your movements are being recorded. Believe it or not, these small things are valuable information. It all builds up to create your digital identity.

The TARTLE Toolbox

What can TARTLE offer people?

A private TARTLE wallet that only they can use and access. The capacity to initiate secure transactions on an open marketplace, where people come to buy these digital assets. The ability to sell data for a digital currency and withdraw US dollars. An internal polling system for research. Shared data with provenance, everything verifiable up to the source. Complete self-custody over your information.

Basically, you have complete control over whether you share your information–and when you do choose to share it, you get paid for your efforts.

Find out what your data is worth now. Sign up for TARTLE here.

Feature Image Credit: Envato Image
FOLLOW @TARTLE_OFFICIAL

For those who are hard of hearing – the episode transcript can be read below:

TRANSCRIPT

Alexander McCaig (00:06):

Okay, Jamie, we're back. Thanks for writing again this outlier ventures on the metaverse, version six of this paper. So can we jump to the part, Jason... We've already discussed what the metaverse is, how TARTLE does it better. But how it's poorly defined here in the paper. And I'm not blaming Jamie. It's just difficult to really distill it down to what it is in simplicity.

Jason Rigby (00:39):

Yeah, and I think he begins to break it down. We're on page eight of this 34-page PDF. So he goes pretty heavy into it. But one of the things that, and these are all buzz words, metaverse, whatever, but he talks about Web3. So that's what I wanted this podcast to be, Web3 in the metaverse. He says, "So why are we so convinced of this eventually," he's talking about the metaverse. "Well, we believe there are several technology trends that are beginning to converge." This is very important.

Alexander McCaig (01:03):

Is TARTLE a great convergence?

Jason Rigby (01:05):

The great.

Alexander McCaig (01:06):

Because if you understand TARTLE, you'll be like, "Oh shit, this is very Web3."

Jason Rigby (01:10):

Yeah. And he wrote a thing called the... Back in 2016, The Convergence Thesis, which is all... And I don't want to get into IOT VR and AR because we talked about the... And AI and all that. He said, "This trend," keep in mind it was written in the context of decades, "Has, as predicted, began to play out and form the basis of our investment thesis as a venture capital firm. And accelerate going through several iterations. The second being the convergence ecosystem in 2018 and then the convergence stack in 2019." So what this all leads to is this is developing 2016 hits. Okay, we're seeing this, what developments have we had? 2018, in two years we saw major shifts. Now at 2019, we're seeing a huge shift. Then we have the great pandemic hits. And now we have an even bigger shift. The pandemic, to me, right now, more than anything, pushed Web3.

Alexander McCaig (02:01):

Yeah. Because-

Jason Rigby (02:02):

Zoom and everything that we have going on.

Alexander McCaig (02:03):

It forced things that were stuck in the very archaic centralized worlds. Think of, what is an office building? It's a giant, phallic centralized area, centralized authority, where you can keep eyes on all your little people. That's what the whole point was in the beginning. Why do you think bankers have such massive towers? But it's remote. People are in the sovereignty and the privacy of their own homes. That's a little flavor of how the internet should be, sovereign and private.

Jason Rigby (02:36):

Sovereign and private, yes.

Alexander McCaig (02:37):

Interesting. But still being, "Wait a minute. I can still generate wealth through doing my work at home for a company, but have sovereignty and privacy. Wait a minute. Wait a minute." Of course, that's exactly what's going to happen with COVID. It's going to drive Web3 to happen because the world gets a taste of how things should be, sovereign, private, wealth generation through work. It's amazing. So they have here for Web3, Web3 is a distinct and separate web paradigm to today's Web2. Web2 is just like this basic world where I go on and I view YouTube, that's it. Or like the sites-

Jason Rigby (03:22):

And there's machine learning that'll give you Netflix, that's 2.

Alexander McCaig (03:26):

Yeah, all great.

Jason Rigby (03:26):

Or just gives you more of what you want.

Alexander McCaig (03:28):

But the thing is, it's, again, centralized authorities defining the web for the users. Now, Web3 is like, "We have to have the user define the web." So Web2, based on centralized platform monopolies and highly regulated financial systems. And now, we go to Web3. What is that? One, that is increasingly decentralized, based on user centricity, and the sovereignty of their data and wealth. Holy shit. What is TARTLE? TARTLE was Web3 before Web3 was a thing. TARTLE's Web fucking 4.0.

Jason Rigby (04:09):

Yeah, we have user centricity, and that we're concerned about the sovereignty of their data and wealth. That's what it's about.

Alexander McCaig (04:16):

Yeah, and it's increasingly decentralized. And it's used by everyone, everywhere.

Jason Rigby (04:20):

It is a paradigm, ultimately based on blockchains and their atomic units of account. He's explaining TARTLE right now. Becoming the means that value is minted, created, stored, or transferred across other technologies as a form of wealth. But digital wealth that can be programmable and represent an increasing complex range of assets.

Alexander McCaig (04:42):

Whoa, whoa.

Jason Rigby (04:43):

What is an asset? Let's describe to people what we at TARTLE view an asset.

Alexander McCaig (04:47):

You know what an asset is? It's stored work.

Jason Rigby (04:50):

Yes. It's that simple.

Alexander McCaig (04:52):

It's as simple as that. An asset like this phone, I guess you could call it an asset, it depreciates in value. But there was energy that went into the generation of this thing, the creation of this. And the person who puts that energy and time into it is the person that owns that asset. So in this digital paradigm, if you are creating information, things that are logged and stored, those would otherwise not exist, Jason, if you did not put in work. If you did not chew on calories on your food, which gave you the energy to operate something digital, to create that log, it would otherwise cease to exist.

Jason Rigby (05:35):

Well, he says it's a Web3 toolbox, but we're going to say TARTLE toolbox for the sake of this.

Alexander McCaig (05:38):

It's a TARTLE toolbox.

Jason Rigby (05:39):

So number one, in his Web3 toolbox is internet money. We have that.

Alexander McCaig (05:45):

We have that.

Jason Rigby (05:45):

Decentralized finance.

Alexander McCaig (05:47):

I have that.

Jason Rigby (05:48):

DeFi is what they call it.

Alexander McCaig (05:49):

Everybody all across the globe has a TARTLE wallet. Anybody that uses it can jump on and have a total sovereign wallet, all to them.

Jason Rigby (05:57):

Sovereign virtual goods.

Alexander McCaig (05:59):

Oh, wait your data, a virtual good. Something that has almost like a plasticity to it, right?

Jason Rigby (06:06):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (06:06):

It has flexibility to be shared. It's not siloed. It's not held up. It has the ability to move.

Jason Rigby (06:11):

And those are NFTs.

Alexander McCaig (06:14):

Oh yeah, every data packet.

Jason Rigby (06:16):

Which he says, "Which can in turn have value on the open market."

Alexander McCaig (06:19):

Oh, TARTLE, it's an open marketplace, where people come to buy these digital assets. Assets that are appropriated to the work of a human being on the other side.

Jason Rigby (06:29):

Okay, here's another Web3 toolbox tool right here, digital physical redemption.

Alexander McCaig (06:34):

Okay, so I sell my data for a digital currency. And then, from that, I can bring that into the physical. I can get real US dollars if I wanted, or whatever else [inaudible 00:06:44].

Jason Rigby (06:44):

Next one is decentralized governance.

Alexander McCaig (06:47):

Oh my God. TARTLE has an internal polling system. We can literally do TARTLE research today and say, "How do you feel about this? What would you like to do?" And every single person that fills out that data packet is essentially generating an NFT, written to the chain, to say that they own it. And it was transacted, and shared that information, at this specific time, for that value.

Jason Rigby (07:05):

Next is self-sovereign identity and verifiable claims.

Alexander McCaig (07:08):

Oh my God, self... You know why it's verifiable? Because all of the data shared on TARTLE has provenance to it. It's completely verified, right back to the source. That's why, when you're actually on the TARTLE marketplace, it's called source.tartle.co.

Jason Rigby (07:25):

And then, the second to the last, is self custody, wallets and applications.

Alexander McCaig (07:30):

Fuck, we just said this. Of course it's self-custody. You decide the control, the what, when, where, and how that information is moved. And what you want to do with the money or the value you receive for the sharing of that information.

Jason Rigby (07:44):

Yeah. And this one, maybe you can explain it to me, or maybe I need to read the definition. He says, "Agent based web. Computer programs with economic agency are autonomous agents that live and transact on blockchains to carry out increasing complex automatic programs such as AEAs, Autonomous Economic Agents, via fetch.ai."

Alexander McCaig (08:01):

Dude, they're Dows.

Jason Rigby (08:03):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (08:03):

They're just Dows with AI appropriated to it. You try to say, "These are the rules for the operation of this system. Here you go. You got to run and live by it."

Jason Rigby (08:12):

And to end this, I want to talk about... He says, "Web3 is built upon foundational elements." And there's three of them.

Alexander McCaig (08:19):

Oh, foundations, this is important.

Jason Rigby (08:20):

So let's compare this to... Because he's saying these are things that are happening in the future. And we're saying the future is here and now, it's TARTLE.

Alexander McCaig (08:26):

This is for you, Jamie. This is for all the outlier-

Jason Rigby (08:28):

And everyone out there that has questions on Web3. You can peer-to-peer networks.

Alexander McCaig (08:33):

Oh my God. Every transaction on TARTLE is from one peer to another. It's from party A to party B. And the more people that join increases the size of the block lattice structure, which means it has a massive network effect of two independent parties coming together and interacting with one another.

Jason Rigby (08:53):

Transaction layer, listen to this what he says about the transaction layer. "Blockchains and other forms of distributed ledger technology, in their simplest form, allow for transfer of units of value from one network participant to another."

Alexander McCaig (09:02):

I literally just said that. Yeah, that's correct.

Jason Rigby (09:07):

And then, finally, and we'll end in this, he says, "Programmability layer, building on the transactional capability, some blockchains offer rich generic programmability to enable a wide array of use cases beyond simple transactionality, while preserving the properties of being decentralized and highly secure. Ethereum was the first mover in establishing a programmable, decentralized ledger. And is still far ahead of its competitors, in terms of adoption by developers and users." So here's my question. So Ethereum is a centralized cryptocurrency, and he's using Ethereum as an example. And I get this, there's collaborative ecosystems, all that stuff. I get all that. But ours is not some coin that we've created out of nowhere and then the value is perceived. People decide that value.

Alexander McCaig (09:49):

Drop the hammer right now.

Jason Rigby (09:50):

Ours is solely based off of... Once again, we say this over and over again, the W word, work. Your work. That's tangible.

Alexander McCaig (09:56):

It's real.

Jason Rigby (09:57):

It's real.

Alexander McCaig (09:58):

That's the basis of human civilization is work.

Jason Rigby (10:00):

Just as much as you go to a job and trade time for money, it's the same thing you're doing with your data.

Alexander McCaig (10:07):

That's precisely correct.

Jason Rigby (10:08):

And it's that simple. There's nothing... So whenever I see a combination of DeFi, NFTs, decentralized governance, decentralized cloud service, self-sovereign identity, programmability layer, all these big words and these buzz words, peer-to-peer networks, all of this, I see one thing. I see TARTLE, and it's already here. It's already created. The future is now.

Alexander McCaig (10:30):

Do you want to come adopt? It's free to adopt. It won't cost you anything.

Jason Rigby (10:34):

So let me tell you, somebody's listening to this, and they're like, "Well, how can I be involved in this, in the sense of buying data?" Like a company's listening right now, and they're like, "I want data. How do I get data?"

Alexander McCaig (10:44):

Yeah, you want to de-risk what you're doing as a business, you want to know. You want to have real interaction with real human beings. You want to transact, have something verifiable. You go tartle.co. You go on the buyer tab. Again, we designed this very simple for anyone to join. And you're going to click on, "Get started."

Jason Rigby (11:02):

And you can go to YouTube and there's walkthroughs-

Alexander McCaig (11:04):

We got walkthrough videos. I had-

Jason Rigby (11:06):

... for buyers.

Alexander McCaig (11:07):

Everything.

Jason Rigby (11:07):

For everything, yeah.

Alexander McCaig (11:08):

Doesn't matter.

Jason Rigby (11:09):

So whatever, we've made it so simple. Everybody can access YouTube. It's a platform that's available and out there.

Alexander McCaig (11:14):

We're not trying to hook you, like, "Ah, you're in, now you got to pay for all this shit. You got to do this." It's like, "No, no, no. It's all here for you.". It's all ripe for the taking. All the education, all the material, all the learning you could ever need to make this tool as valuable as possible for yourself, and the rest of the globe, is right there.

Jason Rigby (11:29):

So let me ask you this question and we'll close on this. Why would a company want to purchase raw data from TARTLE?

Alexander McCaig (11:36):

Ah, well, do you just want me to give one reason or every reason under the sun? The first one you want to do is, you want to, de-risk your business going into the future. All these businesses are becoming data driven businesses. Every company is becoming a tech company. So if you want to de-risk your evolution, you want to make sure that you evolve appropriately, and you want to do it so that you can make effective decisions that establish real relationships with your end customer, you do it through TARTLE. Does that make sense? So if you want to sign up, you want to do something smart, it's free for you to sign up. It's not like Salesforce, "Oh yeah, come and use it. Here's a 14 day free trial. And then after that, we charge you 1,000 bucks per license."

Alexander McCaig (12:18):

No, stupid, there's way too much friction. Everything about it is wrong. You can't access the resources. You can't learn anything. None of the modules, nothing. You got to pay up front for all that stuff. We saw the value in removing all that friction. We understand the importance of it. So let's get all those barriers out of the way for you and make it so easy for you to really interact with real human beings. De-risk your business and become what you're supposed to be. Help the world evolve, help your company evolve.

Jason Rigby (12:45):

I love that. And it's tartle.co. Can sign up today. How is TARTLE... I know I said I was going to do one more question, but I love this. How can businesses help TARTLE save humanity? I think this is really important.

Alexander McCaig (12:58):

This is super cool. Businesses are resource holders, that's what they are. Large businesses, they hold resources and they need to appropriate those in the proper direction. Now, when you, as a business, come on and you say, "I want to buy data from a group of individuals on the TARTLE marketplace." Those individuals can channel the resources that you've paid them for that asset towards causes, big seven causes. Stabilizing our climate, that's a big deal. Increasing educational access, that's a big deal. Public health. The people know what needs to be solved in their local communities. So it's not for you to go in and solve it for them. Every time you're buying data from them, they can then mobilize those resources to things that are truly beneficial to them in their local areas.

Speaker 3 (13:57):

Thank you for listening to TARTLE Cast with your hosts, Alexander McCaig and Jason Rigby. Where humanity steps into the future and source data defines the path, the path. What's your data worth?