Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
August 8, 2022

Find Out How Your Business Can Win at Data and Succeed Now

Find Out How Your Business Can Win at Data and Succeed Now

SHARE: 
BY: TARTLE

Automation, data collection, machine learning, and artificial intelligence was developed to make humanity more efficient. But in many ways, the complete opposite happens. 

When companies prioritize setting up multiple streams of data over investing in data management or data analytics, then the flood of data will eventually become overwhelming. It is crucial that businesses have a system and process for collecting, using, and managing data. 

IT and HR departments, in particular, face this issue the most. Plenty of teams do not have the expertise in data analytics to make the most out of the data being collected. There are so many tools for data collection, but the true utility of data is out of reach in many cases.

Join Alexander and Jason as they question modern data collection methods, and how it can be improved to create a win-win situation for both businesses and their target audience.

Is “Too Much Data” a Possibility?

Imagine having data collection software that could track employee behavior, keystrokes, morale, and employee sentiments. Or having companies tap into Fitbits and Apple Watches so they can monitor your health and keep wellness costs done.

Aside from the fact that this sounds like something out of George Orwell’s 1984, your target audience would want to know, at the very least, that all the data that’s being collected is being treated with dignity and respect. 

Today, data is an extension of an individual’s identity. It has information on personal habits, whereabouts, and relationships. Individuals must hold businesses, applications, and institutions to a higher level of accountability when it comes to managing personal data. On the other side of the coin, businesses need to invest in tools and platforms that respect the digital identity of their target audience. 

Treating Data With Respect

Data analytics isn’t something that you should do on your own and it definitely isn’t something you should shoehorn into your HR or IT department. Instead of ingesting multiple streams at once and then cramming for solutions to overcome the flood, TARTLE gives businesses an avenue to go directly to the individuals who create these data streams and buy their information from them. 

TARTLE was built to give companies they need to source ethical data. There is no need to invest in third party programs and backdoor applications that disenfranchise either you or your audience. On TARTLE, everybody gets the compensation they deserve for working on their data.

What’s your data worth?

Sign up for TARTLE through this link here.

Follow Alexander McCaig on Twitter and Linkedin.

Feature Image Credit: Envato Image
FOLLOW @TARTLE_OFFICIAL

For those who are hard of hearing – the episode transcript can be read below:

TRANSCRIPT

Alexander McCaig (00:10):

... great flood. And we're not talking about 11,000 years ago or 13,000. We are talking about the great flood of data today. The data deluge.

Jason Rigby (00:10):

Deluge.

Alexander McCaig (00:21):

What is...

Jason Rigby (00:22):

Let me, a deluge of data is gathered that can rapidly swamp IT and HR systems. This is from shrm.org website here. And it's talking about sensors, internet of things, devices that are hooked up, the computer systems, the networking, all this automation gets added. It's really cool, but it's overwhelming systems. And so organizations, what can they do to harness this data?

Alexander McCaig (00:50):

Well, the thing is it's like drinking from the fire hose.

Jason Rigby (00:52):

Yeah. It's like, remember those dogs that get their cheeks all fucking [inaudible 00:00:56].

Alexander McCaig (00:55):

Yeah. It just all... It's just blasting them. But that's the point. You set up all these new streams. If all these rivers are pouring in, how you deal with the new flow rate? And that's why you get the deluge. It's like it's going to too much data for some companies. If their teams are not ready for it, if their systems or workflows are not appropriate to it, will overwhelm them.

Jason Rigby (01:20):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (01:22):

One thing they could do is go to Tartle and say, "Okay, rather than us just ingesting all the streams all at once and then figuring it out, why don't we go to Tartle and buy these streams only when we need them piecemeal from the individuals who create them?

Jason Rigby (01:36):

Yes. I love this. Yes.

Alexander McCaig (01:37):

And then let Tartle deal with the housing and all the flows of the water and all that's going on there. And we'll just pull from the stream by buying into it when we need it. Rather than let's just suck it all up at once. Oh my God, we can't handle it. It's actually, we're doing a disservice to service to our company by thinking that just ingesting all these feeds is beneficial for us.

Jason Rigby (02:00):

Yeah. And they were talking about, especially in the HR department in particular. Let's say that you have... They were talking about Microsoft Teams as well as a host of other systems to track employee behavior, keystrokes activity, levels, morale, and employee sentiment.

Alexander McCaig (02:17):

That's insane.

Jason Rigby (02:19):

As these organizational network analysis begin to happen, we're identifying communication. We're identifying social technical networks within an organization. And then, some people are even tapping into employee's Fitbits and Apple watches, HR side, to keep wellness costs down. This new flood augments an HR department that is already equipped with all these tools that HR is known for just subscribing to all these different types of, yeah, tools.

Alexander McCaig (02:48):

Everything under the sun.

Jason Rigby (02:49):

It's like, yeah, we've captured all this data. We've stored all this data. We have government identification numbers. We have dates of birth. We have payroll, we have bank details. We have benefits. We have medical information. We have background checks. And that's just the beginning of everything that we have on that person. Excuse me. There's no doubt that this data is exploding. And what do these departments do with it? Especially HR, what do you do with all the sensitive data you're collecting?

Alexander McCaig (03:18):

They're not data scientists. They're an HR department. They don't know what to do. It's going to bog them down. Then you start forcing people that are specialists in HR to get into data analysis? Doesn't work.

Jason Rigby (03:29):

Yeah. And that's what we're talking about. It's like this growing mountain of HR data is analytics. Now you have analytics applications in these many areas, but who uses analytics mainly? And this is what the article's talking about. It's mainly high level management and marketing.

Alexander McCaig (03:43):

That's it.

Jason Rigby (03:43):

Are the two that use analytics. The HR department's not looking at all the data they're collecting. They're just collecting data. And so how do you have leading organizations? How do you have vendors? How do you have this surge of data that's coming to you. But then here's where Tartle comes in. How do you prevent data misuse?

Alexander McCaig (04:05):

Perfect. Data misuse is saying, "Well, I have all this stuff. I'm just going to start appropriating it to whatever." Okay. The first thing you don't want to misuse is people's rights to their data. You're going to buy it through Tartle. And then you're only going to get what you need just to start until you got to handle yes. On how you're going to use these things.

Okay. Start with what you need first. Don't have some other company come up to you and say, "We'll start analyzing this. You need more data streams. We'll give you analytics." Don't waste your money doing that. Simply go to the source of the information, the source of the river. Okay. Understand. Establish the relationship first. HR is about people.

Jason Rigby (04:47):

Period.

Alexander McCaig (04:48):

Simple as that.

Jason Rigby (04:49):

Humans.

Alexander McCaig (04:49):

All You got to do is connect with that human. Start simply. And then later, if you're like, "Oh, you know what? Maybe I need a new additive data stream." Start getting a new data packet from those people. Don't go to all these million different providers, offering you all different formats under the sun. Trying to understand what's going on, make it all complicated and shining with graphs and shit like that, gets you all sold. And you're all pumped up, showing your boss. Not the way to do it. It's wasteful. It's ineffective. It doesn't benefit both parties.

Jason Rigby (05:18):

Well, and that's what's funny in the article is they're saying, "Hey, you need machine learning."

Alexander McCaig (05:22):

That's what I mean.

Jason Rigby (05:23):

"You need AI, you need deep learning platforms." And then on top of that, you need to have these new technology solution so you can scale and accelerate. [inaudible 00:05:32] These are all buzzwords.

Alexander McCaig (05:32):

"You need a bigger ship to ride this monster wave. Come on. Oh, you got to get a new type of mast. Oh, that mast. There's going to be an increased amount of winds. You're going to need bigger sails now. Oh, that rudder? Far too short for the length of this hull. We're going to have to spruce that up."

And then you got this thing, this Frankenstein that's been stuck together, trying to swim in the ocean. When all you got to do is just, here's your buoyant little craft. Ride the waves. Don't try and navigate through them. Just let the move with the flow, is the ebb and flow of these things. The best way to do is establish the flow from the people who generate the flow. Human beings.

Jason Rigby (06:08):

And HR. You don't need all these backdoor programs and all third party passive aggressive.

Alexander McCaig (06:15):

Tracking [inaudible 00:06:16].

Jason Rigby (06:15):

When you can just go to the person and ask. Have a wellness data packet.

Alexander McCaig (06:19):

How are you feeling this week?

Jason Rigby (06:20):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (06:22):

Wow. Do you want to talk about it? Do you need resources? You can do it all in one shot.

Jason Rigby (06:29):

Well, remember we talked about direct primary care? And I feel like that's going to be a surge in healthcare, decentralized healthcare, to get away. Especially for wellness stuff, having one of these nurse practitioners, physician assistants with direct primary care, that's contracted to the organization, let's say it's a Microsoft. They could have 20 of these.

And have a little nursing facility or whatever. They're on staff. You could have... I mean, obviously schools have this. But they're centralized. But having these little decentralizations and then having them look at the data, bring that person and having that human to human contact. Because this is the beautiful part about Tartle. Those people, inside the organization, even though they're being contracted out to Microsoft, they could have data packets also.

Alexander McCaig (07:21):

Absolutely.

Jason Rigby (07:22):

That are speaking directly to those employees.

Alexander McCaig (07:24):

Absolutely. There's no reason you can't do that. It's an effective, well-balanced system. And if there's a great flood, take a ride on the Tartle life boat.

 

August 8, 2022

Find Out How Your Business Can Win at Data and Succeed Now

Find Out How Your Business Can Win at Data and Succeed Now

SHARE: 
BY: TARTLE

Automation, data collection, machine learning, and artificial intelligence was developed to make humanity more efficient. But in many ways, the complete opposite happens. 

When companies prioritize setting up multiple streams of data over investing in data management or data analytics, then the flood of data will eventually become overwhelming. It is crucial that businesses have a system and process for collecting, using, and managing data. 

IT and HR departments, in particular, face this issue the most. Plenty of teams do not have the expertise in data analytics to make the most out of the data being collected. There are so many tools for data collection, but the true utility of data is out of reach in many cases.

Join Alexander and Jason as they question modern data collection methods, and how it can be improved to create a win-win situation for both businesses and their target audience.

Is “Too Much Data” a Possibility?

Imagine having data collection software that could track employee behavior, keystrokes, morale, and employee sentiments. Or having companies tap into Fitbits and Apple Watches so they can monitor your health and keep wellness costs done.

Aside from the fact that this sounds like something out of George Orwell’s 1984, your target audience would want to know, at the very least, that all the data that’s being collected is being treated with dignity and respect. 

Today, data is an extension of an individual’s identity. It has information on personal habits, whereabouts, and relationships. Individuals must hold businesses, applications, and institutions to a higher level of accountability when it comes to managing personal data. On the other side of the coin, businesses need to invest in tools and platforms that respect the digital identity of their target audience. 

Treating Data With Respect

Data analytics isn’t something that you should do on your own and it definitely isn’t something you should shoehorn into your HR or IT department. Instead of ingesting multiple streams at once and then cramming for solutions to overcome the flood, TARTLE gives businesses an avenue to go directly to the individuals who create these data streams and buy their information from them. 

TARTLE was built to give companies they need to source ethical data. There is no need to invest in third party programs and backdoor applications that disenfranchise either you or your audience. On TARTLE, everybody gets the compensation they deserve for working on their data.

What’s your data worth?

Sign up for TARTLE through this link here.

Follow Alexander McCaig on Twitter and Linkedin.

Feature Image Credit: Envato Image
FOLLOW @TARTLE_OFFICIAL

For those who are hard of hearing – the episode transcript can be read below:

TRANSCRIPT

Alexander McCaig (00:10):

... great flood. And we're not talking about 11,000 years ago or 13,000. We are talking about the great flood of data today. The data deluge.

Jason Rigby (00:10):

Deluge.

Alexander McCaig (00:21):

What is...

Jason Rigby (00:22):

Let me, a deluge of data is gathered that can rapidly swamp IT and HR systems. This is from shrm.org website here. And it's talking about sensors, internet of things, devices that are hooked up, the computer systems, the networking, all this automation gets added. It's really cool, but it's overwhelming systems. And so organizations, what can they do to harness this data?

Alexander McCaig (00:50):

Well, the thing is it's like drinking from the fire hose.

Jason Rigby (00:52):

Yeah. It's like, remember those dogs that get their cheeks all fucking [inaudible 00:00:56].

Alexander McCaig (00:55):

Yeah. It just all... It's just blasting them. But that's the point. You set up all these new streams. If all these rivers are pouring in, how you deal with the new flow rate? And that's why you get the deluge. It's like it's going to too much data for some companies. If their teams are not ready for it, if their systems or workflows are not appropriate to it, will overwhelm them.

Jason Rigby (01:20):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (01:22):

One thing they could do is go to Tartle and say, "Okay, rather than us just ingesting all the streams all at once and then figuring it out, why don't we go to Tartle and buy these streams only when we need them piecemeal from the individuals who create them?

Jason Rigby (01:36):

Yes. I love this. Yes.

Alexander McCaig (01:37):

And then let Tartle deal with the housing and all the flows of the water and all that's going on there. And we'll just pull from the stream by buying into it when we need it. Rather than let's just suck it all up at once. Oh my God, we can't handle it. It's actually, we're doing a disservice to service to our company by thinking that just ingesting all these feeds is beneficial for us.

Jason Rigby (02:00):

Yeah. And they were talking about, especially in the HR department in particular. Let's say that you have... They were talking about Microsoft Teams as well as a host of other systems to track employee behavior, keystrokes activity, levels, morale, and employee sentiment.

Alexander McCaig (02:17):

That's insane.

Jason Rigby (02:19):

As these organizational network analysis begin to happen, we're identifying communication. We're identifying social technical networks within an organization. And then, some people are even tapping into employee's Fitbits and Apple watches, HR side, to keep wellness costs down. This new flood augments an HR department that is already equipped with all these tools that HR is known for just subscribing to all these different types of, yeah, tools.

Alexander McCaig (02:48):

Everything under the sun.

Jason Rigby (02:49):

It's like, yeah, we've captured all this data. We've stored all this data. We have government identification numbers. We have dates of birth. We have payroll, we have bank details. We have benefits. We have medical information. We have background checks. And that's just the beginning of everything that we have on that person. Excuse me. There's no doubt that this data is exploding. And what do these departments do with it? Especially HR, what do you do with all the sensitive data you're collecting?

Alexander McCaig (03:18):

They're not data scientists. They're an HR department. They don't know what to do. It's going to bog them down. Then you start forcing people that are specialists in HR to get into data analysis? Doesn't work.

Jason Rigby (03:29):

Yeah. And that's what we're talking about. It's like this growing mountain of HR data is analytics. Now you have analytics applications in these many areas, but who uses analytics mainly? And this is what the article's talking about. It's mainly high level management and marketing.

Alexander McCaig (03:43):

That's it.

Jason Rigby (03:43):

Are the two that use analytics. The HR department's not looking at all the data they're collecting. They're just collecting data. And so how do you have leading organizations? How do you have vendors? How do you have this surge of data that's coming to you. But then here's where Tartle comes in. How do you prevent data misuse?

Alexander McCaig (04:05):

Perfect. Data misuse is saying, "Well, I have all this stuff. I'm just going to start appropriating it to whatever." Okay. The first thing you don't want to misuse is people's rights to their data. You're going to buy it through Tartle. And then you're only going to get what you need just to start until you got to handle yes. On how you're going to use these things.

Okay. Start with what you need first. Don't have some other company come up to you and say, "We'll start analyzing this. You need more data streams. We'll give you analytics." Don't waste your money doing that. Simply go to the source of the information, the source of the river. Okay. Understand. Establish the relationship first. HR is about people.

Jason Rigby (04:47):

Period.

Alexander McCaig (04:48):

Simple as that.

Jason Rigby (04:49):

Humans.

Alexander McCaig (04:49):

All You got to do is connect with that human. Start simply. And then later, if you're like, "Oh, you know what? Maybe I need a new additive data stream." Start getting a new data packet from those people. Don't go to all these million different providers, offering you all different formats under the sun. Trying to understand what's going on, make it all complicated and shining with graphs and shit like that, gets you all sold. And you're all pumped up, showing your boss. Not the way to do it. It's wasteful. It's ineffective. It doesn't benefit both parties.

Jason Rigby (05:18):

Well, and that's what's funny in the article is they're saying, "Hey, you need machine learning."

Alexander McCaig (05:22):

That's what I mean.

Jason Rigby (05:23):

"You need AI, you need deep learning platforms." And then on top of that, you need to have these new technology solution so you can scale and accelerate. [inaudible 00:05:32] These are all buzzwords.

Alexander McCaig (05:32):

"You need a bigger ship to ride this monster wave. Come on. Oh, you got to get a new type of mast. Oh, that mast. There's going to be an increased amount of winds. You're going to need bigger sails now. Oh, that rudder? Far too short for the length of this hull. We're going to have to spruce that up."

And then you got this thing, this Frankenstein that's been stuck together, trying to swim in the ocean. When all you got to do is just, here's your buoyant little craft. Ride the waves. Don't try and navigate through them. Just let the move with the flow, is the ebb and flow of these things. The best way to do is establish the flow from the people who generate the flow. Human beings.

Jason Rigby (06:08):

And HR. You don't need all these backdoor programs and all third party passive aggressive.

Alexander McCaig (06:15):

Tracking [inaudible 00:06:16].

Jason Rigby (06:15):

When you can just go to the person and ask. Have a wellness data packet.

Alexander McCaig (06:19):

How are you feeling this week?

Jason Rigby (06:20):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (06:22):

Wow. Do you want to talk about it? Do you need resources? You can do it all in one shot.

Jason Rigby (06:29):

Well, remember we talked about direct primary care? And I feel like that's going to be a surge in healthcare, decentralized healthcare, to get away. Especially for wellness stuff, having one of these nurse practitioners, physician assistants with direct primary care, that's contracted to the organization, let's say it's a Microsoft. They could have 20 of these.

And have a little nursing facility or whatever. They're on staff. You could have... I mean, obviously schools have this. But they're centralized. But having these little decentralizations and then having them look at the data, bring that person and having that human to human contact. Because this is the beautiful part about Tartle. Those people, inside the organization, even though they're being contracted out to Microsoft, they could have data packets also.

Alexander McCaig (07:21):

Absolutely.

Jason Rigby (07:22):

That are speaking directly to those employees.

Alexander McCaig (07:24):

Absolutely. There's no reason you can't do that. It's an effective, well-balanced system. And if there's a great flood, take a ride on the Tartle life boat.

 

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