Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
June 11, 2021

GS1 US Analyze the Supply Chain

GS1 US Analyze the Supply Chain

GS1 US Analyze the Supply Chain

SHARE: 
BY: TARTLE

GS1 US and Online Shopping

At risk of sounding like a broken record, COVID has dramatically changed the way we do a lot of things. One of the single biggest changes to how we live now has been in our buying habits and the retail world has had to adapt accordingly.  This is of course obvious, but in any industry there is a demand for data that is more granular than just whatever is obvious on the surface. For that, you need a way to track purchases. Fortunately, this kind of system has already been in place for years in the form of bar codes. Most of those little rectangles of black lines on every product that you purchase was first issued by a company called GS1 US. Because this company issues most of the bar codes out there, it is one of if not the biggest aggregators of purchasing data in the world. It is their data that has shown through cold hard analysis the massive shift to online shopping. 

How massive is that shift? So massive that in the first month of COVID lockdowns online shopping grew as much as it would have in eight years of normal growth. We are now approaching the one year mark since the first lockdowns were initiated in the US. During that time, online shopping has only grown, driven by continued restrictions, some businesses going under, and people who would just rather not deal with masks or other issues that arise when going out to the store. 

That is only part of the story though. While some businesses have been destroyed by COVID restrictions, others have sprung into existence in the last year while others that were only niche businesses in 2019 are now mainstream. Take curbside pickup. There were a few restaurants and grocery stores that were already exploring these options. Walmart in particular – being highly data driven – had already identified that many preferred to not deal with going in the store. So when the lockdowns started to roll out, they already had the infrastructure in place for something that has now become a major part of their business. Not that these things are always flawless. If you aren’t careful, you can get a lot of interesting substitutions in your order. Fortunately, data analysis can help identify if there is a systemic issue that needs solving or if such things are merely anomalies.

One of the most interesting businesses that is well suited for the COVID world is Carvana. This business not only lets you buy vehicles online, it will deliver them to your door. They include several high resolution photos so you can get all the information you need on the car before making a purchase. That definitely helps if you are someone who would rather not deal with car salesmen and driving around to different car lots, sometimes taking days before you find one you like. 

In many ways, COVID has merely accelerated trends that were already in motion. Even before 2020, businesses like DoorDash, GrubHub, UberEats and others were gaining steam. Shipt, Shopify, and others have shared similar explosive growth. It isn’t only relatively new companies or places like Walmart that have been moving in this direction though. Even established businesses with high end items like jewelry stores in New York City have gotten in on the game. I have it on good authority that it is possible to by jewelry for your fiancĂ© from NYC while never leaving your desk in New Mexico. If you ask us, that’s a little wild, but a little awesome too. 

The only thing we would like to add is that too many of these businesses are still reacting, operating on old data. TARTLE, through our data marketplace we can connect businesses to individuals directly, allowing them to identify trends just as they are getting started, if not before. In that way, we can help shape the future in a way that is better for everyone. 

What’s your data worth? Sign up and join the TARTLE Marketplace with this link here.

Feature Image Credit: Envato Elements
FOLLOW @TARTLE_OFFICIAL

For those who are hard of hearing – the episode transcript can be read below:

TRANSCRIPT

Speaker 1 (00:07):

Welcome to Tartle Cast, with your hosts, Alexander McCaig and Jason Rigby. Where humanity steps into the future, and source data defines the path.

Alexander McCaig (00:24):

Hello, hello, welcome back to Tartle Cast.

Jason Rigby (00:28):

T Cast.

Alexander McCaig (00:29):

T Cast. I am so worried about the supply chain. Can it handle the stress of COVID?

Jason Rigby (00:34):

Can it handle the stress of-

Alexander McCaig (00:35):

Find out tonight at 8:00 PM.

Jason Rigby (00:36):

Yes, with retail.

Alexander McCaig (00:39):

Oh boy, so-

Jason Rigby (00:41):

Mom and pop retails, out of business.

Alexander McCaig (00:42):

Yeah-

Jason Rigby (00:43):

Amazon, flourishing.

Alexander McCaig (00:45):

Flourishing.

Jason Rigby (00:45):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (00:45):

Well, no hey, not bad. You know what I was saying? You've been... We've been hanging out to long.

Jason Rigby (00:50):

It's that [inaudible 00:00:50].

Alexander McCaig (00:51):

You're using the same words.

Jason Rigby (00:52):

It's the real thing.

Alexander McCaig (00:52):

Yeah, it's not Coca Cola, it's consciousness.

Jason Rigby (00:54):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (00:55):

The... Barcodes.

Jason Rigby (00:59):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (00:59):

Who'd a thunk? Every time... I don't know... Some people don't know this, if you want to institute a product, it has to have a barcode so that, through some sort of point of sales system it can be registered, and tracked. So there's a leader in this market called GS1 US. Ridiculous name. But they [crosstalk 00:01:20]-

Jason Rigby (01:20):

Sounds so government.

Alexander McCaig (01:21):

Yeah. They institute a huge amount of barcodes. There's a couple of vendors that you can do it through, but most products that you receive are... When you purchase your barcodes in a set of 100, or 10,000, or whatever it might be, it's from them. They sell the blocks of it. Because the overall supply chain system product system is tracked by them. So here's what's interesting is that they found that-

Jason Rigby (01:44):

We need their data.

Alexander McCaig (01:45):

Yeah, their data's really interesting. Is that when we're looking at it, they've collected so much information on buying habits... Because when you use a barcode, it'll tell you if it was something was purchased online with its SKU, or if it was purchased in store. And so they saw this huge transition because of COVID into online purchasing, and how big was the differential?

Jason Rigby (02:07):

Yeah, this is the article, this is what it says. "While consumers crammed as much as eight years of spending growth into one month-"

Alexander McCaig (02:15):

Eight years.

Jason Rigby (02:17):

According to The Shelby Report. So that's one month. Eight years of spending growth in one month. That's crazy, so imagine all these months that we've been in this COVID land.

Alexander McCaig (02:28):

Yeah, and so they're... All that online purchasing and everything, flourishing. Seriously, it's growing at rapid speeds. But GS1 US, they're coming in the... The individual, the lady here who is responsible for looking at new technologies for GS1, they are trying to analyze just so much data that has come in through all this online purchasing. And how there can be an efficient transition from mom and pop, or in store, to online purchasing. But also, most stores have their shipping and fulfillment in store. But now you have to rely on other people to manage that shipping and fulfillment. So that SKU touches so many other places before it hits the end consumer.

Alexander McCaig (03:11):

So they're looking at, from a supply chain standpoint, and the data it's generating, let's look at the processes, the workflows, and how we can change our strategies, become more efficient, and adopt this new model of people doing almost all of their shopping online.

Jason Rigby (03:25):

Yeah, and she said that in many ways, the COVID-19 pandemic has been the unexpected driver of digital transformation. That has been top of mind among the retail industry for years. So the retail industry has been thinking, "Well, we need to go... We need to move to online shopping." And I'm thinking of especially big purchases. Whether you go to a jewelry store, whether you purchase an automobile or a home, all this, the real estate, the automobile, they're all looking at, "How can we do this online?" People want to purchase big items online.

Alexander McCaig (03:55):

I'll give a personal example. So my fiance, I'm not trying to flex, that's just a funny French word.

Jason Rigby (04:03):

Fiance.

Alexander McCaig (04:03):

Her... The design and everything, and working with the jewler, was completely done online. The purchasing, everything. From videos, photos, design, the layouts, everything, I did the entire thing online. I never went to New York. The big box retailers, they've been... they're reactive. Now they're like, "Wow, now we have to make that digital transformation." We've been saying, "Let's not spend, let's not spend. There's enough people coming into the store." That's gone. That's out the window right now. So it's like, we really need to make that transition towards this sort of online shopping experience and delivering the product or the service to the people efficiently without them having to even leave their house.

Jason Rigby (04:42):

Yeah. And I think you're going to see a huge shift as the population changes.

Alexander McCaig (04:48):

Because I don't even think-

Jason Rigby (04:49):

Where millennials... I mean, for instance, you have Carvana now, website. You've heard of them. And there's others out there. But Carvana, you can purchase a used vehicle all online, and it's shipped to your door.

Alexander McCaig (05:02):

Yeah, they literally drop it right off. And if you... And you can use it for 90 days.

Jason Rigby (05:03):

Yeah, and they have pictures, you can zoom in. Yeah, and you can picture, and you can zoom in, and see if there's any issues. And they have it very detailed. So having that bad experience of doing to an automobile dealership is not there, or what people perceive as being there. But this is when-

Alexander McCaig (05:20):

And you know that better than anyone. You worked in the automobile industry for a long time.

Jason Rigby (05:23):

Yeah, yeah, for a long time. Yeah, and that's something that... And we'll have to... I think it would be fun, we'll have to a whole show on the auto industry.

Alexander McCaig (05:29):

I'll interview you on the auto industry.

Jason Rigby (05:32):

Yeah, I think it would be interesting in what's going on. I mean, you have TrueCar, another one, that's just... all they're doing is surmassing... this is crazy. So let me ask you something.

Alexander McCaig (05:42):

Okay?

Jason Rigby (05:43):

What if you could be a company that you could go into an automobile dealership and you could say, "You're going to pay us for us to go into your DMS system and for the 40, 50 years you've been in existence, we get to pull all your data out."

Alexander McCaig (05:59):

Oh, dealer management?

Jason Rigby (06:00):

But you got to pay us.

Alexander McCaig (06:01):

Does that mean dealer management?

Jason Rigby (06:02):

Yeah, dealer management. So, so-

Alexander McCaig (06:03):

... we'll go in, take all your data-

Jason Rigby (06:05):

... and we're going to use it to market to buyers. But you're going to pay us for taking your data.

Alexander McCaig (06:12):

Yeah, so that we can give you some sort of report back.

Jason Rigby (06:14):

So we can give you a lead back. And we're going to charge you $300 for that lead.

Alexander McCaig (06:17):

That's insane.

Jason Rigby (06:19):

And we're going to take your data.

Alexander McCaig (06:19):

That's... You know what that-

Jason Rigby (06:21):

The data should be free.

Alexander McCaig (06:21):

That's classic data companies.

Jason Rigby (06:23):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (06:24):

You see it with IBM, you see it with [crosstalk 00:06:25] investment, they do. Even in pharmaceutical companies, they'll go in and they'll be like, "Here, we'll give you data back. We'll give you some sort of analysis back on the data you have that wasn't already giving you answers." You only pay $300 or something that wasn't giving me any answers in the first place.

Jason Rigby (06:39):

Yeah, exactly.

Alexander McCaig (06:40):

You know?

Jason Rigby (06:41):

And we're going to make you compete with all the other dealerships.

Alexander McCaig (06:43):

With all the other people that were doing the same thing-

Jason Rigby (06:44):

And we're going to see how low blow invoice you could purchase the vehicle for. So, it's-

Alexander McCaig (06:49):

It's so insane. They're just like... It's so illogical it blows my mind.

Jason Rigby (06:54):

Yeah, so at the dealerships I've worked with I'm like, "You don't need to be giving your data to anyone."

Alexander McCaig (06:59):

No.

Jason Rigby (07:00):

It's your data.

Alexander McCaig (07:00):

Yeah, you take care of it, you own it.

Jason Rigby (07:02):

Yep. So this is interesting, the exploration and collaboration opportunities to help businesses leverage emerging technologies, and these emerging technologies are the internet of things, IOT, blockchain, and machine learning. And she said, "Through this, and when we look at the retail supply chain experience, as far as focusing on retail industry collaboration, people don't think about the collabs." We're seeing that with brands more and more and more. Where they're collaborating together, and using their buying power together. "To improve inventory accuracy, exchanging [inaudible 00:07:31], product data, and achieving source to store supply chain visibility."

Alexander McCaig (07:34):

Yeah. It's about sharing data back and forth.

Jason Rigby (07:36):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (07:36):

And now they're starting to do that. And so as more of these businesses become digitized, once they realize that they need to be online, that's where the shift is. Basic cause and effect. You could be blind and still see this, that this interaction of sharing and moving the data back and forth allows them to make effective decisions that make them more resilient as a business.

Jason Rigby (07:53):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (07:54):

Duh.

Jason Rigby (07:54):

Yeah, and if you're a... We were talking earlier about somebody that sells books, that they should be on Amazon. And you're like, "Well, people are..." I mean, you weren't, but people would be like, "Well why should they be on Amazon?" Because that's your distribution center. And you're tapping into a whole... You're tapping into, if they're typing it... I guarantee you, you will sell more books.

Alexander McCaig (08:12):

Yeah, you're leveraging-

Jason Rigby (08:13):

If you put it on Amazon.

Alexander McCaig (08:14):

You're leveraging the technology of Amazon.

Jason Rigby (08:15):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (08:16):

And so what they're saying here, GS1 US is saying is that, these collab businesses are leveraging the technology that all of them have.

Jason Rigby (08:21):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (08:22):

Is that not intelligent? Of course it is, that's how you should be doing it.

Jason Rigby (08:26):

And COVID sparked this. We know we should've been doing this, but now we have to do it.

Alexander McCaig (08:31):

Now it's forced us to do it.

Jason Rigby (08:32):

Yes, right.

Alexander McCaig (08:33):

And the companies that saw it ahead of time and made it-

Jason Rigby (08:35):

Oh, yeah. Oh yeah.

Alexander McCaig (08:36):

Those are the ones making the boo koo bucks right now.

Jason Rigby (08:38):

Yes, yeah, exactly.

Alexander McCaig (08:39):

I don't know what that word means, boo koo. I'm going to have to look it up, I like it.

Jason Rigby (08:41):

Yeah, and I like this... She talks about, "Are we ready for checking in instead of checking out?" She said, "If COVID-19 pandemic's taught us anything it's that consumers are adaptive when they need to be. Shoppers who tried curbside pickup once or twice before are now superusers. In fact, 85% of shoppers have significantly increased curbside pickups since the pandemic began."

Alexander McCaig (09:01):

You know who did a good job with adopting this quickly? Because they're very technology driven, is Walmart.

Jason Rigby (09:05):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (09:05):

Walmart did this way before COVID and it's incredible. You put your thing in, the GPS tracks you, it knows when you're in the parking lot, and it tells you that your thing's coming out in five minutes. Nuts, I never even got out of the car. I didn't have to go insane going into Walmart, which is the last thing I want to do.

Jason Rigby (09:21):

Right, exactly. And I thought that it was interesting when they said, "the rapid digital transformer leads to even more opportunities to harness the power of data. And we should in turn see an uptick in the use of AI, IoT, and machine learning to help process it."

Alexander McCaig (09:32):

She loves buzzwords.

Jason Rigby (09:33):

Yeah. "For example, a German based startup called GPS utilized an IoT platform in combination with digital product tags. Versatile in their use, the digital product tags provide in store analytics, and enable the convenience of the cashier-less shopping experience."

Alexander McCaig (09:45):

Yeah, so-

Jason Rigby (09:46):

"With a built in loss prevention tactic through the use of the smart tag."

Alexander McCaig (09:49):

Yeah no, they... It's like the big RFID scanners. You walk in with your cart, it knows you're in their, you put the stuff in the cart, you walk out of the building. And it just charges your account.

Jason Rigby (09:58):

Right, and the tag is released and [crosstalk 00:10:00]-

Alexander McCaig (10:00):

You know what's ridiculous?

Jason Rigby (10:01):

... it claims with that.

Alexander McCaig (10:01):

That technology's been around for so long.

Jason Rigby (10:04):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (10:04):

20 plus years, and only now they're like, "Oh, wait a minute, why... we start using it now." Where have you been?

Jason Rigby (10:11):

Yeah, where?

Alexander McCaig (10:12):

Pay attention.

Jason Rigby (10:13):

Yeah, this is-

Alexander McCaig (10:14):

Japan was on top of this so long ago.

Jason Rigby (10:16):

Oh, so long ago.

Alexander McCaig (10:17):

Why is no one look... They have some really cool technology over there, and they're pretty smart because they're such a big population in a small space, they're always thinking about how to make things more efficient. Well, why don't you just apply that to a place with a lot of space, then you're just super efficient.

Jason Rigby (10:31):

Yeah, no [crosstalk 00:10:32]-

Alexander McCaig (10:32):

Do you know what I mean?

Jason Rigby (10:33):

Yeah, no kidding. I've read a really cool article. And I did some research on it, was the guy that invented the cashier machine. And he invented receipts. Think about how that's... I mean, we still use paper receipts now.

Alexander McCaig (10:47):

Yeah, they're not, they're not-

Jason Rigby (10:48):

But think about invention of receipts.

Alexander McCaig (10:49):

You know heat transferred paper?

Jason Rigby (10:50):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (10:50):

For receipts. Receipts don't print on ink, they do heat transfer. So actually, one of my family members created that. And he originally used it for weather mapping.

Jason Rigby (11:00):

Oh, that makes sense.

Alexander McCaig (11:01):

What the heck.

Jason Rigby (11:02):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (11:02):

Isn't that crazy?

Jason Rigby (11:03):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (11:03):

So he goes from something that you're doing for weather mapping, and it transitions to stores and point of sale systems.

Jason Rigby (11:08):

But I mean, think about it, the invention of the receipt.

Alexander McCaig (11:11):

Yeah.

Jason Rigby (11:12):

That's crazy.

Alexander McCaig (11:13):

Well that's what blockchain is.

Jason Rigby (11:14):

Yes, exactly. That's what I was getting into.

Alexander McCaig (11:17):

We have all of our receipts verified by everybody in consistent chronological format right here.

Jason Rigby (11:22):

Yeah, so the minute you walk into that Amazon store, and it knows who you are, and it's got your GPS. And you walk in there and you grab that gallon of oat milk. And then it charges you when you walk out the door. It's very, very simple. And then it keeps a transaction of all of that on your orders.

Alexander McCaig (11:38):

Yeah, I don't have... Don't... You know what's... Why are you asking me if I want a receipt?

Jason Rigby (11:42):

Well, I think rental cars did this. You know how you can walk now... I've done that several times, you just walk right up to there, you get into a car.

Alexander McCaig (11:50):

Yeah, you can... you do it with your phone. The app puts it against it, and they have a reader inside of the car, and it unlocks it.

Jason Rigby (11:54):

Yeah, and it unlocks it and away you go. You don't even talk to anyone.

Alexander McCaig (11:57):

Duh.

Jason Rigby (11:57):

You just get into the car and you drive.

Alexander McCaig (11:59):

Yeah, Zipcars.

Jason Rigby (11:59):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (12:00):

They're way overpriced, but the model of it is cool.

Jason Rigby (12:02):

Yeah, and we'll figure it out. We're resilient.

Alexander McCaig (12:05):

I mean, they're ahead of their time.

Jason Rigby (12:06):

Yes. Humanity is resilient.

Alexander McCaig (12:08):

They're using old technology to be ahead of their time. Is that a logical fallacy or what?

Jason Rigby (12:14):

Yeah, and then I want to end on this. She said, "What will it take to turn big data into good data?"

Alexander McCaig (12:18):

The... Big data right now is completely observational. And we're going to hammer this again, like we hammered on every single episode. It's about being proactive and looking at the data as a human being creating that data.

Jason Rigby (12:30):

Yeah, and she quoted Steven Hawking, once said, "Intelligence is the ability to adapt to change."

Alexander McCaig (12:39):

Yeah. Well then, her whole article's talking about being reactive.

Jason Rigby (12:43):

Yes, now is the time-

Alexander McCaig (12:44):

Why would she give us a contradictory quote to the entire thing she wrote?

Jason Rigby (12:48):

Well I think she writes this, "Now is the time to consider the new possibilities for data to derive maximum value when new layers of technology are applied."

Alexander McCaig (12:55):

Okay. It's not about data deriving the maximum value, it's about connecting with the people that create that data to drive the maximum value.

Jason Rigby (13:01):

To drive the maximum value. Yes, 100%.

Alexander McCaig (13:03):

Why do they keep omitting people from the picture? She needs to wake up. I'm going to tell her right now, she can... bring her on the podcast. We got to talk to her. You're missing the grandest point of this entire thing, that no matter what, human beings are the cause for all. For all. Is is that hard to recognize?

Jason Rigby (13:23):

It... Humans are the reason for the cause. You're not in business if you don't have customers.

Alexander McCaig (13:29):

Oh my gosh, it's so simple.

Jason Rigby (13:30):

It's very, very simple.

Alexander McCaig (13:31):

It just blows my mind. I... It makes me twinge inside that people just don't see that.

Jason Rigby (13:36):

And regardless of what industry you're in, you have a responsibility, as a leader, to put people first.

Alexander McCaig (13:43):

Yes you do.

Jason Rigby (13:44):

That's your responsibility.

Alexander McCaig (13:45):

Yeah, and you'll find great benefits, emotionally, mentally, financially, for doing so.

Jason Rigby (13:52):

It's a win-win.

Alexander McCaig (13:53):

That is some goodwill that you... Most companies value is... Have you gone on a 10K?

Jason Rigby (14:01):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (14:01):

Where they value their goodwill.

Jason Rigby (14:03):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (14:05):

That's a strange thing to value, but that's where the money is. It's how people perceive you. And if you lack perception then you don't really know anything. You're walking around blind in this world, like those... you get your eyes dilated and you got the big black things on your eyes, you look like a fly, right?

Jason Rigby (14:20):

Yeah, because there's nothing that motivates you, especially when you're on your deathbed, than knowing that you had a black Excel sheet when you were in the black.

Alexander McCaig (14:31):

You shouldn't have brought up the deathbed comment. I think about my death all the time.

Jason Rigby (14:37):

I know, yeah, we did a podcast on that.

Alexander McCaig (14:38):

Not in a negative sense, but the fact that I can reflect on what it is that I want to do for the world. I don't want to say, "Oh, great, make tons of money." Okay, cool. What did that do?

Jason Rigby (14:49):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (14:50):

Jack. Oh, I can't take it with me. So do something valuable. And you got to start with people. The value is with people.

Jason Rigby (14:57):

It is always with people.

Alexander McCaig (14:59):

And unlock that value at tartle.co.

Jason Rigby (15:01):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (15:02):

You unlock it. You take that big skeleton key, you drive it in that giant 30 foot wooden door in front of the Vatican, you crack that bad Larry open. You go right down in that Vatican library and you start pulling all the data out of there. Everything that the Pope didn't want to share, you just start yanking those books out.

Jason Rigby (15:16):

I need some Michelangelo paintings.

Alexander McCaig (15:19):

I need it all. I'm going to collect it all.

Jason Rigby (15:22):

I just took everything away that wasn't David.

Alexander McCaig (15:26):

Oh, I love that quote. I love that quote.

Jason Rigby (15:28):

It works for everything. If you want to be-

Alexander McCaig (15:31):

[crosstalk 00:15:31].

Jason Rigby (15:31):

If you want to sound really smart in a visit... If you're in a meeting just give that story and then say that line. And I guarantee you people will be like, "Oh that's so right."

Alexander McCaig (15:44):

"That's really interesting. How can we apply that to a lot of stuff?"

Jason Rigby (15:46):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (15:46):

Well, what was it exactly? So just to do it before we close, here's the story.

Jason Rigby (15:49):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (15:50):

The Pope goes in to meet with Michelangelo, and Michelangelo, he carved David. Big, beautiful marble statue. This big naked body, curly hair, pondering. And the Pope asks Michelangelo, he's like, "How did you create something like this?" And he turns around to the Pope and he says, "I just removed everything that wasn't David."

Jason Rigby (16:12):

Yes, yes, so beautiful.

Alexander McCaig (16:14):

I'm not going to explain it, just think about it for a bit. But it's quite a beautiful statement.

Jason Rigby (16:16):

Yeah, I always use this one in marketing, it works really well too if you're into marketing.

Alexander McCaig (16:19):

Yeah.

Jason Rigby (16:20):

You can say, "I like that idea, but let's just take that and reverse it." People are like, "Oh."

Alexander McCaig (16:28):

Wait a minute.

Jason Rigby (16:28):

It's pretty much just reverse engineering something, but-

Alexander McCaig (16:30):

Yeah, that's all we do all day long.

Jason Rigby (16:31):

Yeah, yeah, that's what we do. Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (16:33):

Yeah because, I don't even want to-

Jason Rigby (16:34):

So we just gave you some tips-

Alexander McCaig (16:35):

Yeah, there was a tip.

Jason Rigby (16:36):

... for your business meetings.

Alexander McCaig (16:36):

Free tip.

Jason Rigby (16:37):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (16:37):

Free data coming your way. Analyze our transcript because we post them all.

Jason Rigby (16:42):

Tartle.co.

Alexander McCaig (16:43):

Yeah. T-A-R-T-L-E.co. Thank you.

Jason Rigby (16:47):

Yes, thank you.

Speaker 1 (16:55):

Thank you for listening to Tartle Cast with your hosts Alexander McCaig and Jason rigby, where humanity steps into the future. And source data defines the path. What's your data worth?

June 11, 2021

GS1 US Analyze the Supply Chain

GS1 US Analyze the Supply Chain

GS1 US Analyze the Supply Chain

SHARE: 
BY: TARTLE

GS1 US and Online Shopping

At risk of sounding like a broken record, COVID has dramatically changed the way we do a lot of things. One of the single biggest changes to how we live now has been in our buying habits and the retail world has had to adapt accordingly.  This is of course obvious, but in any industry there is a demand for data that is more granular than just whatever is obvious on the surface. For that, you need a way to track purchases. Fortunately, this kind of system has already been in place for years in the form of bar codes. Most of those little rectangles of black lines on every product that you purchase was first issued by a company called GS1 US. Because this company issues most of the bar codes out there, it is one of if not the biggest aggregators of purchasing data in the world. It is their data that has shown through cold hard analysis the massive shift to online shopping. 

How massive is that shift? So massive that in the first month of COVID lockdowns online shopping grew as much as it would have in eight years of normal growth. We are now approaching the one year mark since the first lockdowns were initiated in the US. During that time, online shopping has only grown, driven by continued restrictions, some businesses going under, and people who would just rather not deal with masks or other issues that arise when going out to the store. 

That is only part of the story though. While some businesses have been destroyed by COVID restrictions, others have sprung into existence in the last year while others that were only niche businesses in 2019 are now mainstream. Take curbside pickup. There were a few restaurants and grocery stores that were already exploring these options. Walmart in particular – being highly data driven – had already identified that many preferred to not deal with going in the store. So when the lockdowns started to roll out, they already had the infrastructure in place for something that has now become a major part of their business. Not that these things are always flawless. If you aren’t careful, you can get a lot of interesting substitutions in your order. Fortunately, data analysis can help identify if there is a systemic issue that needs solving or if such things are merely anomalies.

One of the most interesting businesses that is well suited for the COVID world is Carvana. This business not only lets you buy vehicles online, it will deliver them to your door. They include several high resolution photos so you can get all the information you need on the car before making a purchase. That definitely helps if you are someone who would rather not deal with car salesmen and driving around to different car lots, sometimes taking days before you find one you like. 

In many ways, COVID has merely accelerated trends that were already in motion. Even before 2020, businesses like DoorDash, GrubHub, UberEats and others were gaining steam. Shipt, Shopify, and others have shared similar explosive growth. It isn’t only relatively new companies or places like Walmart that have been moving in this direction though. Even established businesses with high end items like jewelry stores in New York City have gotten in on the game. I have it on good authority that it is possible to by jewelry for your fiancĂ© from NYC while never leaving your desk in New Mexico. If you ask us, that’s a little wild, but a little awesome too. 

The only thing we would like to add is that too many of these businesses are still reacting, operating on old data. TARTLE, through our data marketplace we can connect businesses to individuals directly, allowing them to identify trends just as they are getting started, if not before. In that way, we can help shape the future in a way that is better for everyone. 

What’s your data worth? Sign up and join the TARTLE Marketplace with this link here.

Feature Image Credit: Envato Elements
FOLLOW @TARTLE_OFFICIAL

For those who are hard of hearing – the episode transcript can be read below:

TRANSCRIPT

Speaker 1 (00:07):

Welcome to Tartle Cast, with your hosts, Alexander McCaig and Jason Rigby. Where humanity steps into the future, and source data defines the path.

Alexander McCaig (00:24):

Hello, hello, welcome back to Tartle Cast.

Jason Rigby (00:28):

T Cast.

Alexander McCaig (00:29):

T Cast. I am so worried about the supply chain. Can it handle the stress of COVID?

Jason Rigby (00:34):

Can it handle the stress of-

Alexander McCaig (00:35):

Find out tonight at 8:00 PM.

Jason Rigby (00:36):

Yes, with retail.

Alexander McCaig (00:39):

Oh boy, so-

Jason Rigby (00:41):

Mom and pop retails, out of business.

Alexander McCaig (00:42):

Yeah-

Jason Rigby (00:43):

Amazon, flourishing.

Alexander McCaig (00:45):

Flourishing.

Jason Rigby (00:45):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (00:45):

Well, no hey, not bad. You know what I was saying? You've been... We've been hanging out to long.

Jason Rigby (00:50):

It's that [inaudible 00:00:50].

Alexander McCaig (00:51):

You're using the same words.

Jason Rigby (00:52):

It's the real thing.

Alexander McCaig (00:52):

Yeah, it's not Coca Cola, it's consciousness.

Jason Rigby (00:54):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (00:55):

The... Barcodes.

Jason Rigby (00:59):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (00:59):

Who'd a thunk? Every time... I don't know... Some people don't know this, if you want to institute a product, it has to have a barcode so that, through some sort of point of sales system it can be registered, and tracked. So there's a leader in this market called GS1 US. Ridiculous name. But they [crosstalk 00:01:20]-

Jason Rigby (01:20):

Sounds so government.

Alexander McCaig (01:21):

Yeah. They institute a huge amount of barcodes. There's a couple of vendors that you can do it through, but most products that you receive are... When you purchase your barcodes in a set of 100, or 10,000, or whatever it might be, it's from them. They sell the blocks of it. Because the overall supply chain system product system is tracked by them. So here's what's interesting is that they found that-

Jason Rigby (01:44):

We need their data.

Alexander McCaig (01:45):

Yeah, their data's really interesting. Is that when we're looking at it, they've collected so much information on buying habits... Because when you use a barcode, it'll tell you if it was something was purchased online with its SKU, or if it was purchased in store. And so they saw this huge transition because of COVID into online purchasing, and how big was the differential?

Jason Rigby (02:07):

Yeah, this is the article, this is what it says. "While consumers crammed as much as eight years of spending growth into one month-"

Alexander McCaig (02:15):

Eight years.

Jason Rigby (02:17):

According to The Shelby Report. So that's one month. Eight years of spending growth in one month. That's crazy, so imagine all these months that we've been in this COVID land.

Alexander McCaig (02:28):

Yeah, and so they're... All that online purchasing and everything, flourishing. Seriously, it's growing at rapid speeds. But GS1 US, they're coming in the... The individual, the lady here who is responsible for looking at new technologies for GS1, they are trying to analyze just so much data that has come in through all this online purchasing. And how there can be an efficient transition from mom and pop, or in store, to online purchasing. But also, most stores have their shipping and fulfillment in store. But now you have to rely on other people to manage that shipping and fulfillment. So that SKU touches so many other places before it hits the end consumer.

Alexander McCaig (03:11):

So they're looking at, from a supply chain standpoint, and the data it's generating, let's look at the processes, the workflows, and how we can change our strategies, become more efficient, and adopt this new model of people doing almost all of their shopping online.

Jason Rigby (03:25):

Yeah, and she said that in many ways, the COVID-19 pandemic has been the unexpected driver of digital transformation. That has been top of mind among the retail industry for years. So the retail industry has been thinking, "Well, we need to go... We need to move to online shopping." And I'm thinking of especially big purchases. Whether you go to a jewelry store, whether you purchase an automobile or a home, all this, the real estate, the automobile, they're all looking at, "How can we do this online?" People want to purchase big items online.

Alexander McCaig (03:55):

I'll give a personal example. So my fiance, I'm not trying to flex, that's just a funny French word.

Jason Rigby (04:03):

Fiance.

Alexander McCaig (04:03):

Her... The design and everything, and working with the jewler, was completely done online. The purchasing, everything. From videos, photos, design, the layouts, everything, I did the entire thing online. I never went to New York. The big box retailers, they've been... they're reactive. Now they're like, "Wow, now we have to make that digital transformation." We've been saying, "Let's not spend, let's not spend. There's enough people coming into the store." That's gone. That's out the window right now. So it's like, we really need to make that transition towards this sort of online shopping experience and delivering the product or the service to the people efficiently without them having to even leave their house.

Jason Rigby (04:42):

Yeah. And I think you're going to see a huge shift as the population changes.

Alexander McCaig (04:48):

Because I don't even think-

Jason Rigby (04:49):

Where millennials... I mean, for instance, you have Carvana now, website. You've heard of them. And there's others out there. But Carvana, you can purchase a used vehicle all online, and it's shipped to your door.

Alexander McCaig (05:02):

Yeah, they literally drop it right off. And if you... And you can use it for 90 days.

Jason Rigby (05:03):

Yeah, and they have pictures, you can zoom in. Yeah, and you can picture, and you can zoom in, and see if there's any issues. And they have it very detailed. So having that bad experience of doing to an automobile dealership is not there, or what people perceive as being there. But this is when-

Alexander McCaig (05:20):

And you know that better than anyone. You worked in the automobile industry for a long time.

Jason Rigby (05:23):

Yeah, yeah, for a long time. Yeah, and that's something that... And we'll have to... I think it would be fun, we'll have to a whole show on the auto industry.

Alexander McCaig (05:29):

I'll interview you on the auto industry.

Jason Rigby (05:32):

Yeah, I think it would be interesting in what's going on. I mean, you have TrueCar, another one, that's just... all they're doing is surmassing... this is crazy. So let me ask you something.

Alexander McCaig (05:42):

Okay?

Jason Rigby (05:43):

What if you could be a company that you could go into an automobile dealership and you could say, "You're going to pay us for us to go into your DMS system and for the 40, 50 years you've been in existence, we get to pull all your data out."

Alexander McCaig (05:59):

Oh, dealer management?

Jason Rigby (06:00):

But you got to pay us.

Alexander McCaig (06:01):

Does that mean dealer management?

Jason Rigby (06:02):

Yeah, dealer management. So, so-

Alexander McCaig (06:03):

... we'll go in, take all your data-

Jason Rigby (06:05):

... and we're going to use it to market to buyers. But you're going to pay us for taking your data.

Alexander McCaig (06:12):

Yeah, so that we can give you some sort of report back.

Jason Rigby (06:14):

So we can give you a lead back. And we're going to charge you $300 for that lead.

Alexander McCaig (06:17):

That's insane.

Jason Rigby (06:19):

And we're going to take your data.

Alexander McCaig (06:19):

That's... You know what that-

Jason Rigby (06:21):

The data should be free.

Alexander McCaig (06:21):

That's classic data companies.

Jason Rigby (06:23):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (06:24):

You see it with IBM, you see it with [crosstalk 00:06:25] investment, they do. Even in pharmaceutical companies, they'll go in and they'll be like, "Here, we'll give you data back. We'll give you some sort of analysis back on the data you have that wasn't already giving you answers." You only pay $300 or something that wasn't giving me any answers in the first place.

Jason Rigby (06:39):

Yeah, exactly.

Alexander McCaig (06:40):

You know?

Jason Rigby (06:41):

And we're going to make you compete with all the other dealerships.

Alexander McCaig (06:43):

With all the other people that were doing the same thing-

Jason Rigby (06:44):

And we're going to see how low blow invoice you could purchase the vehicle for. So, it's-

Alexander McCaig (06:49):

It's so insane. They're just like... It's so illogical it blows my mind.

Jason Rigby (06:54):

Yeah, so at the dealerships I've worked with I'm like, "You don't need to be giving your data to anyone."

Alexander McCaig (06:59):

No.

Jason Rigby (07:00):

It's your data.

Alexander McCaig (07:00):

Yeah, you take care of it, you own it.

Jason Rigby (07:02):

Yep. So this is interesting, the exploration and collaboration opportunities to help businesses leverage emerging technologies, and these emerging technologies are the internet of things, IOT, blockchain, and machine learning. And she said, "Through this, and when we look at the retail supply chain experience, as far as focusing on retail industry collaboration, people don't think about the collabs." We're seeing that with brands more and more and more. Where they're collaborating together, and using their buying power together. "To improve inventory accuracy, exchanging [inaudible 00:07:31], product data, and achieving source to store supply chain visibility."

Alexander McCaig (07:34):

Yeah. It's about sharing data back and forth.

Jason Rigby (07:36):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (07:36):

And now they're starting to do that. And so as more of these businesses become digitized, once they realize that they need to be online, that's where the shift is. Basic cause and effect. You could be blind and still see this, that this interaction of sharing and moving the data back and forth allows them to make effective decisions that make them more resilient as a business.

Jason Rigby (07:53):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (07:54):

Duh.

Jason Rigby (07:54):

Yeah, and if you're a... We were talking earlier about somebody that sells books, that they should be on Amazon. And you're like, "Well, people are..." I mean, you weren't, but people would be like, "Well why should they be on Amazon?" Because that's your distribution center. And you're tapping into a whole... You're tapping into, if they're typing it... I guarantee you, you will sell more books.

Alexander McCaig (08:12):

Yeah, you're leveraging-

Jason Rigby (08:13):

If you put it on Amazon.

Alexander McCaig (08:14):

You're leveraging the technology of Amazon.

Jason Rigby (08:15):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (08:16):

And so what they're saying here, GS1 US is saying is that, these collab businesses are leveraging the technology that all of them have.

Jason Rigby (08:21):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (08:22):

Is that not intelligent? Of course it is, that's how you should be doing it.

Jason Rigby (08:26):

And COVID sparked this. We know we should've been doing this, but now we have to do it.

Alexander McCaig (08:31):

Now it's forced us to do it.

Jason Rigby (08:32):

Yes, right.

Alexander McCaig (08:33):

And the companies that saw it ahead of time and made it-

Jason Rigby (08:35):

Oh, yeah. Oh yeah.

Alexander McCaig (08:36):

Those are the ones making the boo koo bucks right now.

Jason Rigby (08:38):

Yes, yeah, exactly.

Alexander McCaig (08:39):

I don't know what that word means, boo koo. I'm going to have to look it up, I like it.

Jason Rigby (08:41):

Yeah, and I like this... She talks about, "Are we ready for checking in instead of checking out?" She said, "If COVID-19 pandemic's taught us anything it's that consumers are adaptive when they need to be. Shoppers who tried curbside pickup once or twice before are now superusers. In fact, 85% of shoppers have significantly increased curbside pickups since the pandemic began."

Alexander McCaig (09:01):

You know who did a good job with adopting this quickly? Because they're very technology driven, is Walmart.

Jason Rigby (09:05):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (09:05):

Walmart did this way before COVID and it's incredible. You put your thing in, the GPS tracks you, it knows when you're in the parking lot, and it tells you that your thing's coming out in five minutes. Nuts, I never even got out of the car. I didn't have to go insane going into Walmart, which is the last thing I want to do.

Jason Rigby (09:21):

Right, exactly. And I thought that it was interesting when they said, "the rapid digital transformer leads to even more opportunities to harness the power of data. And we should in turn see an uptick in the use of AI, IoT, and machine learning to help process it."

Alexander McCaig (09:32):

She loves buzzwords.

Jason Rigby (09:33):

Yeah. "For example, a German based startup called GPS utilized an IoT platform in combination with digital product tags. Versatile in their use, the digital product tags provide in store analytics, and enable the convenience of the cashier-less shopping experience."

Alexander McCaig (09:45):

Yeah, so-

Jason Rigby (09:46):

"With a built in loss prevention tactic through the use of the smart tag."

Alexander McCaig (09:49):

Yeah no, they... It's like the big RFID scanners. You walk in with your cart, it knows you're in their, you put the stuff in the cart, you walk out of the building. And it just charges your account.

Jason Rigby (09:58):

Right, and the tag is released and [crosstalk 00:10:00]-

Alexander McCaig (10:00):

You know what's ridiculous?

Jason Rigby (10:01):

... it claims with that.

Alexander McCaig (10:01):

That technology's been around for so long.

Jason Rigby (10:04):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (10:04):

20 plus years, and only now they're like, "Oh, wait a minute, why... we start using it now." Where have you been?

Jason Rigby (10:11):

Yeah, where?

Alexander McCaig (10:12):

Pay attention.

Jason Rigby (10:13):

Yeah, this is-

Alexander McCaig (10:14):

Japan was on top of this so long ago.

Jason Rigby (10:16):

Oh, so long ago.

Alexander McCaig (10:17):

Why is no one look... They have some really cool technology over there, and they're pretty smart because they're such a big population in a small space, they're always thinking about how to make things more efficient. Well, why don't you just apply that to a place with a lot of space, then you're just super efficient.

Jason Rigby (10:31):

Yeah, no [crosstalk 00:10:32]-

Alexander McCaig (10:32):

Do you know what I mean?

Jason Rigby (10:33):

Yeah, no kidding. I've read a really cool article. And I did some research on it, was the guy that invented the cashier machine. And he invented receipts. Think about how that's... I mean, we still use paper receipts now.

Alexander McCaig (10:47):

Yeah, they're not, they're not-

Jason Rigby (10:48):

But think about invention of receipts.

Alexander McCaig (10:49):

You know heat transferred paper?

Jason Rigby (10:50):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (10:50):

For receipts. Receipts don't print on ink, they do heat transfer. So actually, one of my family members created that. And he originally used it for weather mapping.

Jason Rigby (11:00):

Oh, that makes sense.

Alexander McCaig (11:01):

What the heck.

Jason Rigby (11:02):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (11:02):

Isn't that crazy?

Jason Rigby (11:03):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (11:03):

So he goes from something that you're doing for weather mapping, and it transitions to stores and point of sale systems.

Jason Rigby (11:08):

But I mean, think about it, the invention of the receipt.

Alexander McCaig (11:11):

Yeah.

Jason Rigby (11:12):

That's crazy.

Alexander McCaig (11:13):

Well that's what blockchain is.

Jason Rigby (11:14):

Yes, exactly. That's what I was getting into.

Alexander McCaig (11:17):

We have all of our receipts verified by everybody in consistent chronological format right here.

Jason Rigby (11:22):

Yeah, so the minute you walk into that Amazon store, and it knows who you are, and it's got your GPS. And you walk in there and you grab that gallon of oat milk. And then it charges you when you walk out the door. It's very, very simple. And then it keeps a transaction of all of that on your orders.

Alexander McCaig (11:38):

Yeah, I don't have... Don't... You know what's... Why are you asking me if I want a receipt?

Jason Rigby (11:42):

Well, I think rental cars did this. You know how you can walk now... I've done that several times, you just walk right up to there, you get into a car.

Alexander McCaig (11:50):

Yeah, you can... you do it with your phone. The app puts it against it, and they have a reader inside of the car, and it unlocks it.

Jason Rigby (11:54):

Yeah, and it unlocks it and away you go. You don't even talk to anyone.

Alexander McCaig (11:57):

Duh.

Jason Rigby (11:57):

You just get into the car and you drive.

Alexander McCaig (11:59):

Yeah, Zipcars.

Jason Rigby (11:59):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (12:00):

They're way overpriced, but the model of it is cool.

Jason Rigby (12:02):

Yeah, and we'll figure it out. We're resilient.

Alexander McCaig (12:05):

I mean, they're ahead of their time.

Jason Rigby (12:06):

Yes. Humanity is resilient.

Alexander McCaig (12:08):

They're using old technology to be ahead of their time. Is that a logical fallacy or what?

Jason Rigby (12:14):

Yeah, and then I want to end on this. She said, "What will it take to turn big data into good data?"

Alexander McCaig (12:18):

The... Big data right now is completely observational. And we're going to hammer this again, like we hammered on every single episode. It's about being proactive and looking at the data as a human being creating that data.

Jason Rigby (12:30):

Yeah, and she quoted Steven Hawking, once said, "Intelligence is the ability to adapt to change."

Alexander McCaig (12:39):

Yeah. Well then, her whole article's talking about being reactive.

Jason Rigby (12:43):

Yes, now is the time-

Alexander McCaig (12:44):

Why would she give us a contradictory quote to the entire thing she wrote?

Jason Rigby (12:48):

Well I think she writes this, "Now is the time to consider the new possibilities for data to derive maximum value when new layers of technology are applied."

Alexander McCaig (12:55):

Okay. It's not about data deriving the maximum value, it's about connecting with the people that create that data to drive the maximum value.

Jason Rigby (13:01):

To drive the maximum value. Yes, 100%.

Alexander McCaig (13:03):

Why do they keep omitting people from the picture? She needs to wake up. I'm going to tell her right now, she can... bring her on the podcast. We got to talk to her. You're missing the grandest point of this entire thing, that no matter what, human beings are the cause for all. For all. Is is that hard to recognize?

Jason Rigby (13:23):

It... Humans are the reason for the cause. You're not in business if you don't have customers.

Alexander McCaig (13:29):

Oh my gosh, it's so simple.

Jason Rigby (13:30):

It's very, very simple.

Alexander McCaig (13:31):

It just blows my mind. I... It makes me twinge inside that people just don't see that.

Jason Rigby (13:36):

And regardless of what industry you're in, you have a responsibility, as a leader, to put people first.

Alexander McCaig (13:43):

Yes you do.

Jason Rigby (13:44):

That's your responsibility.

Alexander McCaig (13:45):

Yeah, and you'll find great benefits, emotionally, mentally, financially, for doing so.

Jason Rigby (13:52):

It's a win-win.

Alexander McCaig (13:53):

That is some goodwill that you... Most companies value is... Have you gone on a 10K?

Jason Rigby (14:01):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (14:01):

Where they value their goodwill.

Jason Rigby (14:03):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (14:05):

That's a strange thing to value, but that's where the money is. It's how people perceive you. And if you lack perception then you don't really know anything. You're walking around blind in this world, like those... you get your eyes dilated and you got the big black things on your eyes, you look like a fly, right?

Jason Rigby (14:20):

Yeah, because there's nothing that motivates you, especially when you're on your deathbed, than knowing that you had a black Excel sheet when you were in the black.

Alexander McCaig (14:31):

You shouldn't have brought up the deathbed comment. I think about my death all the time.

Jason Rigby (14:37):

I know, yeah, we did a podcast on that.

Alexander McCaig (14:38):

Not in a negative sense, but the fact that I can reflect on what it is that I want to do for the world. I don't want to say, "Oh, great, make tons of money." Okay, cool. What did that do?

Jason Rigby (14:49):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (14:50):

Jack. Oh, I can't take it with me. So do something valuable. And you got to start with people. The value is with people.

Jason Rigby (14:57):

It is always with people.

Alexander McCaig (14:59):

And unlock that value at tartle.co.

Jason Rigby (15:01):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (15:02):

You unlock it. You take that big skeleton key, you drive it in that giant 30 foot wooden door in front of the Vatican, you crack that bad Larry open. You go right down in that Vatican library and you start pulling all the data out of there. Everything that the Pope didn't want to share, you just start yanking those books out.

Jason Rigby (15:16):

I need some Michelangelo paintings.

Alexander McCaig (15:19):

I need it all. I'm going to collect it all.

Jason Rigby (15:22):

I just took everything away that wasn't David.

Alexander McCaig (15:26):

Oh, I love that quote. I love that quote.

Jason Rigby (15:28):

It works for everything. If you want to be-

Alexander McCaig (15:31):

[crosstalk 00:15:31].

Jason Rigby (15:31):

If you want to sound really smart in a visit... If you're in a meeting just give that story and then say that line. And I guarantee you people will be like, "Oh that's so right."

Alexander McCaig (15:44):

"That's really interesting. How can we apply that to a lot of stuff?"

Jason Rigby (15:46):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (15:46):

Well, what was it exactly? So just to do it before we close, here's the story.

Jason Rigby (15:49):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (15:50):

The Pope goes in to meet with Michelangelo, and Michelangelo, he carved David. Big, beautiful marble statue. This big naked body, curly hair, pondering. And the Pope asks Michelangelo, he's like, "How did you create something like this?" And he turns around to the Pope and he says, "I just removed everything that wasn't David."

Jason Rigby (16:12):

Yes, yes, so beautiful.

Alexander McCaig (16:14):

I'm not going to explain it, just think about it for a bit. But it's quite a beautiful statement.

Jason Rigby (16:16):

Yeah, I always use this one in marketing, it works really well too if you're into marketing.

Alexander McCaig (16:19):

Yeah.

Jason Rigby (16:20):

You can say, "I like that idea, but let's just take that and reverse it." People are like, "Oh."

Alexander McCaig (16:28):

Wait a minute.

Jason Rigby (16:28):

It's pretty much just reverse engineering something, but-

Alexander McCaig (16:30):

Yeah, that's all we do all day long.

Jason Rigby (16:31):

Yeah, yeah, that's what we do. Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (16:33):

Yeah because, I don't even want to-

Jason Rigby (16:34):

So we just gave you some tips-

Alexander McCaig (16:35):

Yeah, there was a tip.

Jason Rigby (16:36):

... for your business meetings.

Alexander McCaig (16:36):

Free tip.

Jason Rigby (16:37):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (16:37):

Free data coming your way. Analyze our transcript because we post them all.

Jason Rigby (16:42):

Tartle.co.

Alexander McCaig (16:43):

Yeah. T-A-R-T-L-E.co. Thank you.

Jason Rigby (16:47):

Yes, thank you.

Speaker 1 (16:55):

Thank you for listening to Tartle Cast with your hosts Alexander McCaig and Jason rigby, where humanity steps into the future. And source data defines the path. What's your data worth?