Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
Tartle Best Data Marketplace
August 27, 2022

Empower Yourself and Learn More About Your Data Here

Empower Yourself and Learn More About Your Data Here

SHARE: 
BY: TARTLE

What if you could get paid to learn more about your data? Join Alexander McCaig and Jason Rigby in this special episode on TARTLE University learning modules. 

We live in a world where other people reap the benefits of our hard work. For decades, we have been kept in the dark about the power of our data–but now is our chance to change that. Through TARTLE, we have the opportunity to empower, equalize, and take ownership of our own data. 

The Power of Data

Today, data is a crucial part of scaling businesses. Companies need to know more about their audience, their processes, and their products. There are so many blind spots that only information can answer. 

TARTLE is a free marketplace that empowers the seller and buyer of data. It’s a nonprofit platform that facilitates ethical data sharing. Continued usage of this platform gives us the opportunity to change our perspective of data, and see it as the fundamental record of truth that can help us elevate all human understanding. 

We emphasize how the platform is a free and public marketplace because it is only through these features that empowerment can truly be achieved for both buyers and sellers. Regardless of race, religion, color, or creed, anyone can participate in the process of sharing data. 

Invest in Your Empowerment

Ultimately, TARTLE has a proven, consistent track record of being transparent in every single process. Every step is meant to involve the end users, without the platform taking anything from any transaction. 

It’s time we invest in platforms that have the best interests of humanity at heart. 

What’s your data worth?

Sign up for TARTLE through this link here.
Follow Alexander McCaig on Twitter and Linkedin.

Feature Image Credit: Envato Image
FOLLOW @TARTLE_OFFICIAL

For those who are hard of hearing – the episode transcript can be read below:

TRANSCRIPT

Alexander McCaig (00:07):

Hello, everyone, and welcome to TARTLE University. You are here with your instructors for today.

Jason Rigby (00:13):

Professor.

Alexander McCaig (00:13):

Yeah, Professor Rigby.

Jason Rigby (00:15):

Jason Rigby.

Alexander McCaig (00:15):

Rigby and Professor McCaig. What we want to start with this first module, why? Why? Fundamentally important, always start with why. Simon Sinek, right?

Jason Rigby (00:25):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (00:25):

We all know that. If you don't know him, look him up. Simon Sinek, Start With Why. Good book. Jason, I got to ask you a question. Why does the world need TARTLE now?

Jason Rigby (00:34):

Well, one, the world needs empowerment.

Alexander McCaig (00:37):

You bet it does.

Jason Rigby (00:38):

Two, the world needs equalization.

Alexander McCaig (00:43):

Yep. You bet it does.

Jason Rigby (00:44):

And three, the world needs to take ownership of their data.

Alexander McCaig (00:48):

Right? And they do that by becoming a part of TARTLE, because the sharing of data is the fundamental record of truth to help us all elevate human understanding, essentially driver one, is that it's better for the planet.

Jason Rigby (01:00):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (01:01):

Better for humanity and better for ourselves, and that all happens with TARTLE. That's why the world needs TARTLE right now. Jason, why is it important that it's a free and public marketplace? I know you love free markets. Why is that so important?

Jason Rigby (01:16):

Because it gives the empowerment back to the seller and the buyer of data. You have a seller, which is you selling your data if you go on there.

Alexander McCaig (01:25):

Yes.

Jason Rigby (01:26):

If you're a company or an individual, you can go in there and buy that data. You can buy data from anyone.

Alexander McCaig (01:31):

Correct.

Jason Rigby (01:32):

You can buy data from your aunt, your uncle. You can buy data from somebody in Russia, South America Canada.

Alexander McCaig (01:32):

It's not exclusive.

Jason Rigby (01:32):

It doesn't matter.

Alexander McCaig (01:40):

It's open for everyone.

Jason Rigby (01:40):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (01:41):

Regardless of race, religion, color, or creed.

Jason Rigby (01:43):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (01:43):

Anyone who's a human being with access to the internet can participate in the total marketplace.

Jason Rigby (01:43):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (01:48):

Okay. That's why it's free. That's why it's public. Jason, why would somebody want to buy your information? If I'm a data buyer, why would I want to buy it from you?

Jason Rigby (01:58):

Because if I'm a company in particular, I have certain information that I do not know. I have a blind spot that that data answers.

Alexander McCaig (02:07):

Yes.

Jason Rigby (02:09):

As a buyer of that data, prime example, if you live in Africa and there's an organization that's looking at maybe starting a satellite office or whatever it may be-

Alexander McCaig (02:21):

Walmart.

Jason Rigby (02:21):

Yes. Then they can ask questions locally on the ground regionally to answer those questions, and you can get paid for that because that's super valuable information to them. They would have to have somebody go door to door knocking on the door and asking people directly. It's insufficient. It's going to have insufficient data and people aren't going to be truthful.

Alexander McCaig (02:45):

No. So it totally-

Jason Rigby (02:46):

But in the privacy of a free market, you can have that opportunity.

Alexander McCaig (02:50):

Oh, opportunity. But we have to take the self-responsibility and the work to do so.

Jason Rigby (02:53):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (02:55):

The reason why that data is turned into data packets is so you can take that information, that truth, that data, that record about yourself, and share it with those companies that want to buy it. Why? Because they need it for understanding.

Jason Rigby (03:06):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (03:07):

It helps you through products and services. It helps protect your areas, your environment, all those other great things through the sharing of that information.

Jason Rigby (03:13):

Yeah, and it was so cool. Somebody the other day, they were like, "Well, I filled out all these data packets and I got paid for this one and I didn't get paid for this one." Then they text us back and they're like, "Oh, I got paid for that one."

Alexander McCaig (03:24):

Yeah.

Jason Rigby (03:24):

Because a buyer could come on that... The marketplace is working for you 24/7. A buyer could come on any time and purchase that data from you, and next thing you know you got an email and you have funds.

Alexander McCaig (03:37):

Why should you be filling out data packets all the time?

Jason Rigby (03:39):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (03:40):

Because it offers you up the opportunity to make money 24/7.

Jason Rigby (03:43):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (03:44):

When you're sleeping-

Jason Rigby (03:45):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (03:45):

... people can come buy data from you.

Jason Rigby (03:46):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (03:47):

Money comes into your wallet.

Jason Rigby (03:48):

Because you would hate to be that one person-

Alexander McCaig (03:48):

Correct.

Jason Rigby (03:51):

... that didn't fill out that data packet that that company was looking for.

Alexander McCaig (03:54):

Precisely.

Jason Rigby (03:56):

Data packets take how long?

Alexander McCaig (03:57):

Oh, they could take-

Jason Rigby (03:59):

This stated packet's going to take you-

Alexander McCaig (04:01):

Some could take, I don't know, a minute, two minutes.

Jason Rigby (04:04):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (04:04):

Some could take 10 seconds.

Jason Rigby (04:05):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (04:06):

Depending on the value, the time, the effort, the work that goes into it will derive the value you receive through the sharing of that data. Why is data privacy important for these things? Why does data privacy help retain the value of a data packet itself, Jason?

Jason Rigby (04:20):

Data privacy in and of itself allows that person to be anonymous to the point of not only does it protect the end user, but it also can protect the buyer. So in this marketplace it can protect both ways.

Alexander McCaig (04:33):

Correct. Then let me ask you something. Because there's privacy, why is then data ownership important? If something's private,-

Jason Rigby (04:41):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (04:42):

... who is the person that determines the privacy? Should a business determine it's private for me, or should I do it for myself?

Jason Rigby (04:47):

You should do it for yourself.

Alexander McCaig (04:47):

Oh, excellent. Okay. Data privacy is important because it's a function of data ownership taking responsibility for the information we create. Now, I want to ask two more questions. One, why should you trust TARTLE?

Jason Rigby (05:01):

Because, for me, why I should trust TARTLE is because they have the best interest at heart for humanity.

Alexander McCaig (05:07):

You bet we do.

Jason Rigby (05:08):

They've been ultra transparent in every single process.

Alexander McCaig (05:12):

Our technology prevents us from even seeing your data.

Jason Rigby (05:14):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (05:15):

If we want it, we would have to buy it from you.

Jason Rigby (05:17):

TARTLE has to buy it.

Alexander McCaig (05:18):

We are an independent third party who only wants to bring other people together for the sharing of that knowledge. That's why you should trust us. We're here to be transparent. We're here to educate, not coerce. We're not here to abuse, we're here to empower.

Jason Rigby (05:30):

That's awesome.

Alexander McCaig (05:30):

Okay? Why, last question, should you be truthful with your responses? Why should you be honest with your responses and your data packets?

Jason Rigby (05:41):

Why should I be honest?

Alexander McCaig (05:42):

Yeah.

Jason Rigby (05:43):

Because I provide accurate information not just for myself, but for that buyer of data. Because if I don't provide accurate information, I'm not going to get other packets purchased.

Alexander McCaig (05:54):

Precisely. Correct. Thank you very much, Professor Rigby.

Speaker 3 (06:04):

Thank you for listening to TARTLEcast with your hosts, Alexander McCaig and Jason Rigby, where humanity steps into the future and source data defines the path, the path. What's your data worth?

 

August 27, 2022

Empower Yourself and Learn More About Your Data Here

Empower Yourself and Learn More About Your Data Here

SHARE: 
BY: TARTLE

What if you could get paid to learn more about your data? Join Alexander McCaig and Jason Rigby in this special episode on TARTLE University learning modules. 

We live in a world where other people reap the benefits of our hard work. For decades, we have been kept in the dark about the power of our data–but now is our chance to change that. Through TARTLE, we have the opportunity to empower, equalize, and take ownership of our own data. 

The Power of Data

Today, data is a crucial part of scaling businesses. Companies need to know more about their audience, their processes, and their products. There are so many blind spots that only information can answer. 

TARTLE is a free marketplace that empowers the seller and buyer of data. It’s a nonprofit platform that facilitates ethical data sharing. Continued usage of this platform gives us the opportunity to change our perspective of data, and see it as the fundamental record of truth that can help us elevate all human understanding. 

We emphasize how the platform is a free and public marketplace because it is only through these features that empowerment can truly be achieved for both buyers and sellers. Regardless of race, religion, color, or creed, anyone can participate in the process of sharing data. 

Invest in Your Empowerment

Ultimately, TARTLE has a proven, consistent track record of being transparent in every single process. Every step is meant to involve the end users, without the platform taking anything from any transaction. 

It’s time we invest in platforms that have the best interests of humanity at heart. 

What’s your data worth?

Sign up for TARTLE through this link here.
Follow Alexander McCaig on Twitter and Linkedin.

Feature Image Credit: Envato Image
FOLLOW @TARTLE_OFFICIAL

For those who are hard of hearing – the episode transcript can be read below:

TRANSCRIPT

Alexander McCaig (00:07):

Hello, everyone, and welcome to TARTLE University. You are here with your instructors for today.

Jason Rigby (00:13):

Professor.

Alexander McCaig (00:13):

Yeah, Professor Rigby.

Jason Rigby (00:15):

Jason Rigby.

Alexander McCaig (00:15):

Rigby and Professor McCaig. What we want to start with this first module, why? Why? Fundamentally important, always start with why. Simon Sinek, right?

Jason Rigby (00:25):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (00:25):

We all know that. If you don't know him, look him up. Simon Sinek, Start With Why. Good book. Jason, I got to ask you a question. Why does the world need TARTLE now?

Jason Rigby (00:34):

Well, one, the world needs empowerment.

Alexander McCaig (00:37):

You bet it does.

Jason Rigby (00:38):

Two, the world needs equalization.

Alexander McCaig (00:43):

Yep. You bet it does.

Jason Rigby (00:44):

And three, the world needs to take ownership of their data.

Alexander McCaig (00:48):

Right? And they do that by becoming a part of TARTLE, because the sharing of data is the fundamental record of truth to help us all elevate human understanding, essentially driver one, is that it's better for the planet.

Jason Rigby (01:00):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (01:01):

Better for humanity and better for ourselves, and that all happens with TARTLE. That's why the world needs TARTLE right now. Jason, why is it important that it's a free and public marketplace? I know you love free markets. Why is that so important?

Jason Rigby (01:16):

Because it gives the empowerment back to the seller and the buyer of data. You have a seller, which is you selling your data if you go on there.

Alexander McCaig (01:25):

Yes.

Jason Rigby (01:26):

If you're a company or an individual, you can go in there and buy that data. You can buy data from anyone.

Alexander McCaig (01:31):

Correct.

Jason Rigby (01:32):

You can buy data from your aunt, your uncle. You can buy data from somebody in Russia, South America Canada.

Alexander McCaig (01:32):

It's not exclusive.

Jason Rigby (01:32):

It doesn't matter.

Alexander McCaig (01:40):

It's open for everyone.

Jason Rigby (01:40):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (01:41):

Regardless of race, religion, color, or creed.

Jason Rigby (01:43):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (01:43):

Anyone who's a human being with access to the internet can participate in the total marketplace.

Jason Rigby (01:43):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (01:48):

Okay. That's why it's free. That's why it's public. Jason, why would somebody want to buy your information? If I'm a data buyer, why would I want to buy it from you?

Jason Rigby (01:58):

Because if I'm a company in particular, I have certain information that I do not know. I have a blind spot that that data answers.

Alexander McCaig (02:07):

Yes.

Jason Rigby (02:09):

As a buyer of that data, prime example, if you live in Africa and there's an organization that's looking at maybe starting a satellite office or whatever it may be-

Alexander McCaig (02:21):

Walmart.

Jason Rigby (02:21):

Yes. Then they can ask questions locally on the ground regionally to answer those questions, and you can get paid for that because that's super valuable information to them. They would have to have somebody go door to door knocking on the door and asking people directly. It's insufficient. It's going to have insufficient data and people aren't going to be truthful.

Alexander McCaig (02:45):

No. So it totally-

Jason Rigby (02:46):

But in the privacy of a free market, you can have that opportunity.

Alexander McCaig (02:50):

Oh, opportunity. But we have to take the self-responsibility and the work to do so.

Jason Rigby (02:53):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (02:55):

The reason why that data is turned into data packets is so you can take that information, that truth, that data, that record about yourself, and share it with those companies that want to buy it. Why? Because they need it for understanding.

Jason Rigby (03:06):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (03:07):

It helps you through products and services. It helps protect your areas, your environment, all those other great things through the sharing of that information.

Jason Rigby (03:13):

Yeah, and it was so cool. Somebody the other day, they were like, "Well, I filled out all these data packets and I got paid for this one and I didn't get paid for this one." Then they text us back and they're like, "Oh, I got paid for that one."

Alexander McCaig (03:24):

Yeah.

Jason Rigby (03:24):

Because a buyer could come on that... The marketplace is working for you 24/7. A buyer could come on any time and purchase that data from you, and next thing you know you got an email and you have funds.

Alexander McCaig (03:37):

Why should you be filling out data packets all the time?

Jason Rigby (03:39):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (03:40):

Because it offers you up the opportunity to make money 24/7.

Jason Rigby (03:43):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (03:44):

When you're sleeping-

Jason Rigby (03:45):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (03:45):

... people can come buy data from you.

Jason Rigby (03:46):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (03:47):

Money comes into your wallet.

Jason Rigby (03:48):

Because you would hate to be that one person-

Alexander McCaig (03:48):

Correct.

Jason Rigby (03:51):

... that didn't fill out that data packet that that company was looking for.

Alexander McCaig (03:54):

Precisely.

Jason Rigby (03:56):

Data packets take how long?

Alexander McCaig (03:57):

Oh, they could take-

Jason Rigby (03:59):

This stated packet's going to take you-

Alexander McCaig (04:01):

Some could take, I don't know, a minute, two minutes.

Jason Rigby (04:04):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (04:04):

Some could take 10 seconds.

Jason Rigby (04:05):

Yes.

Alexander McCaig (04:06):

Depending on the value, the time, the effort, the work that goes into it will derive the value you receive through the sharing of that data. Why is data privacy important for these things? Why does data privacy help retain the value of a data packet itself, Jason?

Jason Rigby (04:20):

Data privacy in and of itself allows that person to be anonymous to the point of not only does it protect the end user, but it also can protect the buyer. So in this marketplace it can protect both ways.

Alexander McCaig (04:33):

Correct. Then let me ask you something. Because there's privacy, why is then data ownership important? If something's private,-

Jason Rigby (04:41):

Right.

Alexander McCaig (04:42):

... who is the person that determines the privacy? Should a business determine it's private for me, or should I do it for myself?

Jason Rigby (04:47):

You should do it for yourself.

Alexander McCaig (04:47):

Oh, excellent. Okay. Data privacy is important because it's a function of data ownership taking responsibility for the information we create. Now, I want to ask two more questions. One, why should you trust TARTLE?

Jason Rigby (05:01):

Because, for me, why I should trust TARTLE is because they have the best interest at heart for humanity.

Alexander McCaig (05:07):

You bet we do.

Jason Rigby (05:08):

They've been ultra transparent in every single process.

Alexander McCaig (05:12):

Our technology prevents us from even seeing your data.

Jason Rigby (05:14):

Yeah.

Alexander McCaig (05:15):

If we want it, we would have to buy it from you.

Jason Rigby (05:17):

TARTLE has to buy it.

Alexander McCaig (05:18):

We are an independent third party who only wants to bring other people together for the sharing of that knowledge. That's why you should trust us. We're here to be transparent. We're here to educate, not coerce. We're not here to abuse, we're here to empower.

Jason Rigby (05:30):

That's awesome.

Alexander McCaig (05:30):

Okay? Why, last question, should you be truthful with your responses? Why should you be honest with your responses and your data packets?

Jason Rigby (05:41):

Why should I be honest?

Alexander McCaig (05:42):

Yeah.

Jason Rigby (05:43):

Because I provide accurate information not just for myself, but for that buyer of data. Because if I don't provide accurate information, I'm not going to get other packets purchased.

Alexander McCaig (05:54):

Precisely. Correct. Thank you very much, Professor Rigby.

Speaker 3 (06:04):

Thank you for listening to TARTLEcast with your hosts, Alexander McCaig and Jason Rigby, where humanity steps into the future and source data defines the path, the path. What's your data worth?

 

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